MikeyB

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MikeyB last won the day on February 16 2015

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About MikeyB

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  1. You should totally head into 4 Corners, off 160, and check that out. Then take the 41/162 back into Utah and turn right on 261 and head up the Moki Dugway and camp at Muley Point.
  2. Clutch- use less of it. Two finger and barely pull it in.Noise- yup.. 1-2 gear - yup. Maybe less clutch and it gets smoother. I found its all about well timed shifts. Oil - Motul 300v - try filling 2/3 rd of the way up on the window. Doesn't burn oil. TC- abs button does the Traction control (asc) as well. Press and hold to cycle through the options, tc- off, abs off, both off... Congrats on the new bike! I love my 2014. It only gets better from here.
  3. pffftt... CA state law says you have to be able to touch the ground while astride the seat.. nothing about standing in the pegs while moving... Also, never had an issue.
  4. Few pictures. The boots, they catch the lip of the seat. (the seat is in the low position, and no, I don't want to raise it to the high position... ! lol)... Same on the other side. Adjustable shifter peg. Nice. Also saw that instead of shortening the link I can rotate the link by a spline and grab some height here as well.
  5. Thanks for the reply Eric. On the 14 GS, on the shifter, there is an adjustment to raise the entire lever, and then there is a set screw at the end where the rubber part of the shifter is, allowing it to rotate. Its offset, so when you rotate it 180 out it puts the actual shift peg further away by like 10mm. 90 degrees gets you a little out and up. Not much, but when I first got the bike, in my work boots, rotating 90 out solved the problem. In my Tech7's, adjusting the linkage for more height seems to get me close to ideal, but still going to machine the linkage down to get a few more mm of height out of it. I did look around and saw that lowering the pegs would probably solve the problems, with the Touratech offroad low setup seems like it would lower my foot down more (thus bringing the shifter and brake up, relatively speaking). Also solves another problem, the inside cuff of my boot will just slide under and in on the edge of the seat and then the boot is "locked in" with the seat and the peg (really neat, I'll get a picture of that phenomina).. Lowering the foot pegs might just be the silver bullet i'm looking for.
  6. Hey guys, So I'm looking for some input here. Please, help me out a little. Off road ergonomics, basically riding while standing, is the subject of the day around here. I found there's a few things to note. 1.) Touratech 40mm risers - are a godsend. I will not ride this bike offroad without these, as they help with standing up and provide overall better control. 2.) Rotating the handle bars - past 10 degrees, (as marked on the bar), but somewhere around 25 or so also helps greatly while standing, giving you better alignment in the wrists to the levers. Now for the part where I'm running into some ergo trouble. I just recently started riding offroad, and as such have discovered the wonderful world of proper footwear. Alpinestarts Tech 7 Enduro boots, comfy, feel great, only took a few days of riding to get used to them. But with the boots come some other problems now. Shifter position. - Absolutely was not high enough. I adjusted the linkage to raise the lever as well as rotated the peg to max height and this works. To get more height (still missing shifts offroad) I am going to machine the linkage to shorten it by a few mm on each end and that should raise the peg a little more and all is good. Brake position. The stock GS Adv brake lever has a few unique things to it. If you adjust the linkage in the rear, it will cause the lever to interfere with the frame. Basically it came from the factory this way and I cannot adjust the linkage to get the pedal any higher. clears the frame by 1mm or so. Now its got the flip down for off-road use. I found this is about perfect for on-road use. Which means, off road, while standing, it is completely useless because I always have it flipped down. Obviously, my only option here is to buy a new lever, but the question is, which one will get me the results I am looking for? Does anyone have any experience with the Touratech brake lever on a 14/15 'GS adventure, or other brand aftermarket brake lever? Thanks.
    I love these tires. They are very slow speed nimble, and track well on the highway at touring speed. Noise is low compared to the Anakee 3's. Some front tire whine is still present but not obtrusive. Grip is amazing. Both wet and dry, no issues. On dirt just as good. They feel more confidence inspiring in turns on dirt than the A3's. Now for the truth. There is a slight shimmy when running over poorly grooved pavement. I cannot tell for sure but I suspect it to be the rear tracking in the groove and causing a slight wander. Not an issue but some other ridersay be disturbed by this phenomenon. On grated bridges it is not bad at all, typical performance there. And it typically doesn't occur all the time, only in certain conditions.
  7. We had a good ride from Hawthorne, over lucky boy pass. Found some sand and after a few minutes I noticed everyone else was not behind me.. So I turn around and the had stopped before it got too bad. And I didn't think it was that bad yet...
  8. Hi Guys. Thanks for having me. You know, every once in a while, I see dual sport guys talking bout "big bikes" etc.. Then I figure out they're talking about 650's or a particular 690, or maybe even a F800... Then I hop on my R1200GSA and scurry along. This is a totally different ball game. and Thanks for bringing XLADV.com. My name is Mike. I live in the Bay Area, Northern California. You may ( mostly not) see me lurking the BARF or ADVRider.com as 'myblunt'. I look forward to hanging out 'round these parts. Below - Overlooking Mono Lake from Cottonwood Canyon Rd, South of Bodie.
    They look great! Fit an finish are good. Do they really work? Hard to say. I suppose, yes, if I were to throw a large rock up in there, these would deflect/absorb the impact and the rock would go away. Small rocks? probably nothing to worry. On the other note, they do not impact the cooling performance of the machine at all.
    They look good. Not cheap feeling, very sturdy construction. Got a wiring harness, and cost includes the mounts (which were about 10-14$ per mount). They are out there for about $35 bucks a pair on Amazon. They look great. Very conspicuous. Seen some guys with em on their trucks around town. They seem brighter than the stock LED headlight and Aux Lights in the official lit-garage eyeball lumen test, so overall I believe these would contribute to the light situation. I will update for another star once I run them at night and can comment further. Lastly, the mounts I bought are made by KC and are not very configurable. That being said, I cannot point these directly straight, they are pointed a few degrees inboard on either side.. (left one points right 3 degrees and the right one points left 3 degrees..) this makes a nice bright spot at 8-10'ft in the garage, but like I mentioned previously, will comment once I run them at night. 3.5 stars for price and construction.
    If you plan on standing at all, for any length of time, do this. Source - I'm 5'10". 40mm is the highest you can go without needing to re-route anything on a '14 GS Adventure. This is by far, the absolute best, and most necessary purchase for your adventure bike. Hands down, no contest. I would even skip the side-stand foot and get this first. Also, once you get used to it, it'll just blow your mind how normal it feels. Other people may stare and their jaws may drop as they see the size of your rise, but pay no heed. Now, on that topic, of all the brands to choose from, I picked these as the most sensible ones. The price is right, the finish is good. The fitment is excellent. Only complaint is now the bars clamp with allen head bolts, so there's another bit to carry in the tool kit. Original clamp bolts were Torx. Also, the rise causes some interference with the windshield, but ultimately, the rotation of the bars in the upward direction contributes to this as well, and there's nothing you can do other than put the windshield in the full up position or just deal with it. I think in one full day of off road riding, we went to full steering lock once. There is plenty of play in the windshield for this, and if you are seriously rigged for offroad, the windshield and mirrors come off anyways so its a non-event.
  9. 2 reviews

    Customize the fit of your BMW R1200GS or GSA with a set of Touratech bar risers. There is no substitute for a bike that fits you. When it's more comfortable, it makes long trips more enjoyable. Many R1200GS riders find that increasing bar height makes a noticeable improvement to their comfort. Raising the bar height results in a more upright position which can relieve neck and back strain. Touratech bar risers also enable a more comfortable and controlled standing position, which is ideal for off-road riding or just stretching the body on a long ride.
    After taxes, and some blood, we fitted the Nav 5 for navigation on the bike. Mostly because, on the '14 GS Adv and various other R-models, it was made for it. The wonder wheel on the left grip and GPS prep package contributed to the easy sell. If not, the GPS prep does give you a nice little bar to clamp things to, but for the most part, having the Nav 5 (Garmin) up there is just convenient for going places. In other news, I only use the Nav when I have no clue where I need to go, and for the most part it is a distraction. The display off function works very well to get your eyes back on the road. Garmin's being what they are, Basecamp is a horrific experience and better suited for those who are technologically seasoned and can stand to learn a software from the 90's era. Mostly good for reviewing and importing tracks and managing waypoints. For me, its 50/50 on if the route I created in Basecamp is going to recalculate, and to see lower level roads or dirt roads, you have to zoom so far in its useless. My favorite trick is planning in Google maps, using gpsvisualizer (dot com) to converter that route into a track (.gpx) and then bringing that over in Basecamp. Then the damned thing recalculates the route anyways, so I usually just drive off of tracks and if I get to far off that's when we go to active routes. The newer boxer engines get the added ability to display telemetry. This is fun, and you can zoom in to basically get your Trip 1 and Trip 2, or whatever data you need to be big and up front. For running roll charts or other data, this is probably better suited than the map screen. I typically like seeing Trip 1 and Range. Cost wise, you're only another hundred out over the latest and greatest Zumo's, and the benefits of having telemetry, and an aesthetically pleasing device may drive your desires to buy it. Needless to say, I haven't regretted the cost, but one could do just fine with a ram mount cradle and a smartphone nowadays.
  10. 2 reviews

    The Navigator V was Co-developed by BMW and Garmin International and is an exclusive BMW Motorrad product that does not have a Garmin consumer equivalent that can be used on motorcycles factory equipped with GPS preparation or with the Motorrad exclusive Advance Cradle. BMW Motorrad has taken trip planning to another level with the Navigator V. Featuring a new larger and brighter 5" TFT Display (800 x 480 pixels and 65,000 colors) than the previous generation Navigator IV, the premium-class, Bluetooth-capable GPS navigation system is a reliable guide both on and off-road, whether traveling by motorcycle or automobile. (NOTE: Does not include a bike-specific mounting bracket which is sold separately.) BMW is pleased to announce the Navigator V! Following on the popularity of the NAV IV, the most widely used Motorrad Navigator ever, BMW Motorrad now offers the new Navigator V. Co-developed by BMW and Garmin International, the Navigator V is an exclusive BMW Motorrad product that will not have a Garmin consumer equivalent capable of being used with motorcycles factory equipped with GPS preparation or the Motorrad exclusive Advance Cradle. The Navigator V has many improvements in features and rider convenience over the previous Navigator IV. Overview -Bigger, brighter 5" display (with same external housing dimensions as NAV IV) with improved readability in direct sunlight. -The integrated storage capacity has been doubled compared to NAV IV (8 GB instead 4 GB). -Improved route planning and navigation logic. -Pre-loaded lifetime (LMU) maps for North America. -Pre-loaded North America BMW Dealer Data base. -Optional Garmin Smartphone Link for traffic information in real time, latest weather en-route and more. -A2DP Stereo Bluetooth technology for hands free telephony, turn-by-turn directions and built in media (MP3) player. -Identical attachment mechanism to NAV IV fits in the existing mount of the 2014-on K1600 series (please choose to add the 2014 instrument cover for earlier machines below, and careful with the satellite radio antenna when removing the original panel (thanks Stephen!)). -3.5 mm jack plug (for headphone connection) and MCX socket (for connecting external antenna). -Compatible with Smartphone Link app via Google Play Store (Android) or iOS App Store (Apple) Contents: -BMW Motorrad Navigator V, including integrated lithiumion battery pack -Free North America map updates for life (up to 4 times per year) -Micro-USB cable -Practical carry bag -Screwdriver -Quick start guide, multilingual -Detailed operating instructions as PDF file on the unit -Garmin ISPI brochure (Important Safety and Product Information) BMW Original Parts PDF Brochure