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robday

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robday last won the day on June 6

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About robday

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  1. robday

    Mono County, June 2018

    No, I'm keeping it. It needs work, though. It's going to be the spare for buddies. A couple of their bikes are down right now and they're all depressed about it, and I figured it would be a nice loaner bike. It has awesome suspension and other goodies, and I would take a huge loss selling it.
  2. robday

    Mono County, June 2018

    Short weekend getaway up to the Eastern Sierras with my buddy Leo on his new Rally GS. Base camp at Lundy Lake, then we crammed a lot of really good riding into Saturday. This post is all about the ride Saturday, June 2nd. Friday and Sunday were travel days. We got up early and made coffee Saturday morning, then hit the trails. From Lundy, we went to Virginia Lakes. We skipped the Copper Mountain run through Jordan Basin because the trail is overgrown, and I didn't want to make Leo scratch up his new bike. And also because the entire run is sharp rocks, and my rear tire is nearly bald. So we slabbed it to Virginia Lakes. Then over Dunderberg Pass into Bridgeport for breakfast at the new Three 95 Cafe (formerly Hays Street Cafe). Super good breakfast! From there we took 182 to Masonic Road and stopped by Chemung Mine. Then up to the top of Masonic Mountain (a first for both of us). Amazing views. We could easily see 60 miles into Nevada and Walker Lake (and beyond). From there into the old Masonic townsite, then a short backtrack to Bodie-Masonic Road and a great ride into Bodie. After poking around for a while, we left via Cottonwood Canyon heading for the north shore of Mono Lake, where we jumped off Cemetary Road to De Chambeau Ranch. It's an old ranch set up like a museum (similar to Bodie). They used to supply all of the meat and produce to the mining operations in the area, including Bodie. From there we went into Lee Vining and up Tioga Pass to Saddlebag Lake, which is still frozen. We went up 120 a bit further to see the sights, then came back down and went out to Mono South Tufa and Navy Beach. Then a burger at Mono Cone before grabbing beer and ice and heading back to camp at Lundy. It was a full day. 160 miles, about half dirt. Conditions were near perfect. Great traction, low dust, clear skies and temps in the 60's and 70's. We had the trails all to ourselves, only seeing one other vehicle all day. The pics are a mix of mine and Leo's (shared with permission).
  3. robday

    High Sierra for Lost for a Reason - 2016

    Hell of an event. This was my first time at this ride, but I'm a long time Mono County "resident". Some of these tracks are my favorites from personal experience, and this area is the main reason I bought a GS a few years ago. It was great meeting so many new friends, and catching up with some old ones. Cyndy Kelso and I met years ago up at Lundy Lake, and it was good to catch up with her as well. I stuck around for another week up there after all of you folks left, and hung out with the Lundy Lunkers, a group of guys who have been gathering up there for the past 50 years. They set up a campsite as a big card room with 3 or 4 tables going constantly. Lots of cash and booze flowing! I came out about 50 bucks ahead...but stayed up until the wee hours, and pretty much wrecked the next day of riding just to recover. Something is up with my phone, and I'm having trouble getting the pics off it. No worries. I'll figure it out and post them soon. I've been checking out everyone's pics and video, and it's great to see others riding the stuff I love. Ok, first thing: Compared to years past, the trails are in generally crappy shape. Drought and a lot of vehicles makes for a lot more sand and chewed up trail than we are accustomed to up there. Two of the routes I consider "super easy" had some tough conditions this year. Bald Mountain is usually a walk in the park, but this year it was mostly sandy on the way up. This one varies a lot because of the road maintenance getting there, and I've done this run two weekends in a row before with completely different results. After riding the main road at 50+ mph one week, the following week saw a fresh load of gravel and a lot of work. So I wasn't 100% sure about this route, and to have it chewed into sand is a bit of a disappointment. But still worth the ride up for the views and that cool little warming hut (I'm pretty sure you can spend the night here without any hassles). I also told just about anyone that would listen that Log Cabin Mine is super easy except for one steep section that gets a little sandy...my apologies for the understatement of the year. I go up this trail every single time I'm up in the area, and this is by far the worst shape I've ever seen it in. But it was great seeing pics and video from the top, knowing riders pushed through that crap anyway. The views alone make it worth it. Did anyone explore the structures up there? Dunderberg Pass...That upper section keeps finding its way into the .gpx file. No idea how, I've never taken a bike up there (or a GPS). Why? Because I know better! LOL!!! I've been up there in my truck, and turned around when my wife started getting freaked out. Sorry to anyone who might have been cursing my name (or Eric's) up there. A small group of us also rode Masonic Road, but stayed on it instead of getting on Bodie/Masonic (this was a mistake I made somehow, but it kinda paid off). There is very little sand on this road (virtually zero) and it has a few decent challenges with rocky areas and step-downs. We came upon three vehicles trying to figure out how to pass each other and went around them on the outside edge with one guy (me) standing there spotting so nobody fell off into certain death and destruction, or maybe just divorce. Same thing, kinda. Brunch at the Bridgeport Inn was great, but I sure do miss Hays Street Cafe, which closed recently after 25 years in business. It's for sale, by the way... The previous day, we did go Dunderberg to Bodie, then out Cottonwood Canyon. From there, it's a quick 1-mile jaunt down Cemetery Road to DeChambeau Ranch, which served Bodie and other townsites back in the day, and is set up like Bodie as a sort of museum. On our rides, we stopped for pics at places like Chemung Mine, Masonic, Bodie, and DeChambeau Ranch. I'll get the others to post their pics. When you see pics of glassy-looking beaver ponds, those are from Lundy Canyon, and might help to explain why I go back there a few times every year. Since something like 1967! Big thanks to Eric for a great event! Also, special thanks to Classy Cowgirl (fantastic food!), June Lake Brewing, Mammoth Powersports, and anyone else who made things happen for us. All of these businesses are now aware that this group will be up there every year, and they are preparing. Very sorry that my buddy Lance Gines got hurt, but he's going to be fine. I've ridden Idaho and a few other states with Lance and Robbie Musheno, those guys are hardcore. It was great seeing them again, but a bummer seeing them leave early. See ya next time, guys. Shout out to my other partners in crime: Rafe Hardy! Rafe bought a new truck and toy hauler when he got home, can't wait to help get it all dirty and scratched up! Mark McClellan, one of my absolute dearest friends in the ADV community, shared the experience with Dan Schoo from BMW of Riverside. Great couple of guys! Rafe, Mark, Dan, and Trinie Lara all stayed an extra night or two at Lundy. Trinie's bike had a persistent flat front tire, and we dropped it off with JW Stoehr of Mammoth Powersports after several attempts to patch the tube. He put in a new one and sold her his last 21" tube as a spare (just in case) to get home. Really good guy. Trinie is a lot of fun to ride with, too. She took a yellowjacket down her collar at one point, and tested Sena's mic gain and speaker output...in our ears...pretty impressive volume, but I was a little disappointed in the massive distortion. Couldn't figure out if she was saying "AAAAAAAGGGHHHH" or "&%$#@!&%$#@!&%$#@!&%$#@!". Gotta get with Sena on that, curse words need to be intelligible. Ross Wenger joined us for the Masonic Road trip, and got to stretch his legs a little on some stuff he hadn't done before. Good guy, we'll be riding again soon. Knows how to curse, fits right in! Need to introduce him to the Lundy Lunkers... My wife Yun arrived just after the event and proceeded to catch a bunch of big trout. She also brought huge King Crab legs, jumbo prawns, ribeyes, portobello mushrooms, and a bunch of other delicious stuff. We ate like KINGS.....after you folks went home. Sorry...not. HAHAHA!!! Between our food and the meals from Classy Cowgirl, I actually gained a couple of pounds. I usually lose a few up there. If anyone is curious about Lundy, have a look on Facebook at pics posted by Trinie Lara, Rafe Hardy, Dan Schoo, or me. It's a little hidden gem in the Sierras, a really magical place. Looking forward to next year...and as soon as I get this problem figured out, my pics will be posted here as well. See ya! Rob Day
  4. robday

    High Sierra 2016

    Hey folks! This is going to be fun, and for me it's even more fun because this area has been my summer stomping grounds since I was a toddler. As Eric mentioned, I'll be leading a very easy ride through the old mining districts. Lots of photo ops and historic stuff. Some shady stories, too... This loop does include Dunderberg Pass. However, the first section (Jordan Basin to Copper Mountain) can easily be skipped if nobody wants that kind of challenge. There is an easier way up to Copper Mountain, or we can just skip it altogether and go straight to Dunderberg from the Virginia Lakes road. I understand some riders had a tough time with the tricky section last year, and that's probably my fault for not explaining it better. Those are some tight, rocky switchbacks. Sorry to anyone who ended up on that section and was cursing my name... But it is worth it to go into that area. If the tough climb is out, we can go in from the other side, which is much easier. It depends on how long we want to be out riding (and what time we start). Cutting out this section can save us a big chunk of time. The rest of the route is easy, with an occasional moderate section. By moderate, I mean still relatively flat, but it might have a few rocks here and there, or a patch of sand. Not a long slog through a sand wash...just a sandy patch of road. This route will bring us into Bodie the back way. If we want to poke around Bodie and take pics, we may want to get an early start on this loop so we have plenty of time. Before Bodie, there are other places we'll be stopping for pics as well (Chemung Mine, Masonic, etc.) and a short little side trip to a cute little pond in the Dunderberg area if anyone is interested. This option has a bit of a challenge in that we might have to ride in a creekbed for 60-70 yards if the creek has washed over the trail. It's a beautiful spot, great for pics but not much else. This time of year, there will be little or no bugs. After Bodie, we'll come out Cottonwood Canyon to Hwy167 for a short distance, then off road again towards the banks of Mono Lake to DeChambeau Ranch. This place is set up like a museum. It served all of the mining communities back in the day with meat, produce, feed, lumber, etc. If we've kept up a decent pace to this point and have an hour or two left over, we can make the run up to Log Cabin Mine before heading back to camp. But I expect we'll already be running a bit late due to stops. But who knows? Best advice would be to get rolling early on this loop. That way we can decide on any or all options and still make it back before dark. Bring a camera...the photo ops will be amazing. Especially in the Conway Summit/Dunderberg/Green Creeks areas. Looking forward to this.
  5. Snow. Being in a tent while it's snowing...sucks. Several years ago I was in the Sierras in October. It's a fantastic time of year to be there. Awesome fall colors, especially the aspens. And NO BUGS. But it can be a crapshoot regarding the weather, and at times will get down below 20 degrees. At this point I was still an avid tent camper. I was the last one in my regular group of camping buddies, including my brother. Temps had been as low as 18 degrees. I was with my girlfriend (now my wife), and two dogs in our large family-sized tent. We had a catalytic heater, but the tent was too big and too cold for the heater to work effectively. So I constructed another "tent" inside the big one using old tent poles and emergency blankets. It was just big enough to cover the air mattress, and the heater was able to keep up. At any time after sunset, you could look in there and find the dogs (and the girlfriend) snuggled up in relative warmth. They looked at me like I was crazy, but I had a point to prove. I had spent the prior 3 days ragging on my brother and his buddies. They all had nice travel trailers, I was the only tent-camper in our group, and when they said I was crazy, I dove deep into trash talking. I called them all "&%$#@!", laughed at their rigs all stacked up next to each other in the little trailer park at Lundy while I was in a beautiful site surrounded by trees and nature about 50 yards away. And these folks were worried about bears, even though they were mostly cops (and armed), sitting in their trailers sipping hot chocolate while my girlfriend, dogs and me were "roughing it"...no firepower, no electricity, our provisions away from the tent but not really secured from the big critters. This is how I had always done it since childhood, and I was goofing on all of them for crossing over to the dark side. Some time around 9pm it started snowing. My dogs were now also looking at me like I was crazy, and wouldn't come out from the tent-inside-a-tent. Yun (my girlfriend) began asking "what-if's". I tried to keep everyone calm by showing them how easy it was to simply stand up and knock the snow off the tent from the inside. See? Piece of cake, we'll be fine. Well, the snow started coming down heavy. I reassured her that we would be fine, we weren't going to be crushed, it was all good. Until I realized I needed to knock the snow off every 15-20 minutes to keep the tent from collapsing...and the snow that slid off was piling up on the sides. And I wouldn't be able to sleep because of this 15-minute drill. It dawned on me that my pride had gotten the better of me, and that I had no options. I told Yun to grab the dogs and all the dry bedding and head for the truck. She noted astutely that there wasn't enough room for all of us to sleep there. I knew this, but kept my mouth shut. My earlier trash talk was about to come full circle. We drove out of our spot and into the trailer park, and I went and knocked on my brother's door asking for some floor space to sleep. I tried to block out the comments. "Who's the &%$#@! now?" The next morning, we went back to our campsite to find the tent collapsed and buried along with the rest of our stuff. Ugh. And there was more snow in the forecast. I was lucky. There had been a cancellation for one of the large, permanent trailers at the resort and we slid right into artificial comfort. Our site was a wreck. We went back after the snow finally stopped to dig everything out. While driving around to waste time waiting for others to arrive, my brother had spotted a teeny little travel trailer for sale in Mono City. It was really small and old, but in good shape. And it had a shower. I bought it on the spot, and we still have it. The dogs and the wife are much happier, but I feel like I've lost something. Other than when out on a bike adventure, this was the last time I tent camped. I've also crossed over to the dark side...but it's warm and dry here.
  6. robday

    PRODUCT REVIEW: TwinMax carb balancer

    Short version: calibrate the TwinMax (set it at max sensitivity and zero the meter without connecting it to anything. There are other procedures, but this is the quickest), connect to throttle bodies, adjust them at appx. 2500-3500rpm. That's about it, other than bike specific stuff. On my bike (2006 R1200GS) I also calibrated the idle actuators with a GS-911. On a triple, you will do two cylinders first, then the third by using one of the first two as a guide. You can then check each one against each other one. The TwinMax is a two-input device only. The SyncPro is up to four cylinders. At max sensitivity, the needle will be deflecting back and forth a lot, just try to get the deflection to average out in the center. Also, if the bike gets too hot while doing the adjustments, shut it down and let it cool for a while before returning. If your bike is water cooled, this might not be an issue. So...I rode a Triumph 1050 Speed Triple last year...at Wheelie University...and crashed it. Got a bit overconfident, but holy crap I was having a good time! HAHA!
  7. robday

    Twinmax Electronic Carburetor Balancer

    I recently used a TwinMax balancer to calibrate my throttle bodies. I'm extremely pleased. I've used a SyncPro in the past with good results (or so I thought), but my unit needs to have the fluid replaced again. It can evaporate if you forget to cap it off in storage (or the guy you lent it to doesn't cap it off). It's kind of a hassle to replace the fluid. And the readings are not as fine as I would really like. So I looked into the TwinMax, which is highly recommended by a lot of other BMW wrenchers. I used it a couple of days ago to balance the throttle bodies on my '06 R1200GS. The TwinMax is a lot easier to use than a manometer because it doesn't have to be vertical. You can hold it in your hand or set it down nearby. I set it on the under-seat storage while working, I could see it clearly while I had both hands on the cable adjusters. The TwinMax also appears to be a lot more sensitive than a manometer, giving very fine readings in vacuum differential and being easy to calibrate before use. I was able to rough-in the adjustment on the TwinMax's medium sensitivity level, and then fine tune it until I had good readings at the highest sensitivity. Today I took the bike for a test ride. WOW. The bike runs better than it has since I've owned it. It's never been this smooth, not even after what I thought was a really good balance on the throttle bodies using the SyncPro. I don't think it was very far out of balance before, but when you can get it JUST RIGHT, the smoothness is incredible. I highly recommend this for balancing the boxer.
  8. I recently used a TwinMax balancer to calibrate my throttle bodies. I'm extremely pleased. I've used a SyncPro in the past with good results (or so I thought), but my unit needs to have the fluid replaced again. It can evaporate if you forget to cap it off in storage (or the guy you lent it to doesn't cap it off). It's kind of a hassle to replace the fluid. And the readings are not as fine as I would really like. So I looked into the TwinMax, which is highly recommended by a lot of other BMW wrenchers. I used it a couple of days ago to balance the throttle bodies on my '06 R1200GS. The TwinMax is a lot easier to use than a manometer because it doesn't have to be vertical. You can hold it in your hand or set it down nearby. I set it on the under-seat storage while working, I could see it clearly while I had both hands on the cable adjusters. The TwinMax also appears to be a lot more sensitive than a manometer, giving very fine readings in vacuum differential and being easy to calibrate before use. I was able to rough-in the adjustment on the TwinMax's medium sensitivity level, and then fine tune it until I had good readings at the highest sensitivity. Today I took the bike for a test ride. WOW. The bike runs better than it has since I've owned it. It's never been this smooth, not even after what I thought was a really good balance on the throttle bodies using the SyncPro. I don't think it was very far out of balance before, but when you can get it JUST RIGHT, the smoothness is incredible. I highly recommend this for balancing the boxer.
  9. Hi folks- I just received a set of Wunderlich Vario levers to use on my '06 GS. The idea is "shorties" for 2-finger ops without crushing the rest of my fingers (mainly the clutch side). Has anyone here used these levers on a GS? I had also bought a cheap set of knockoffs from China for $25, but never installed them because they look really cheap and fragile, and are still too long for what I want. The Varios look great, and are plenty short, which is what I wanted. I did this on my GT last year (Synto's) and really liked the result. Any advice you folks have would be greatly appreciated! Thanks...
  10. robday

    What I Hate About BMW

    I had thought at one time that I would be buying a water-boxer as soon as they started to hit the used market. But a couple of things bothered me, as mentioned above. Why no lower enduro-type gearing? And why would they switch to a wet clutch, when the dry clutch was very good, with a big friction zone? I've decided to get as much life from my '06 as possible. And after a ton of mods and upgrades, I'm kinda stuck with it anyway (unless I want to take a bath selling it). That's fine, I'm committed to it. It really does seem as if BMW is moving away from the real off-road scene, especially racing. Kinda sad. The GS was once the "go-to" bike for world adventure. The new GS could be that, too, but it doesn't seem as if BMW is promoting it that way. And it's true, more than 90% of riders will rarely, or never, see any serious dirt. That doesn't mean the bike shouldn't be built for it. It SHOULD mean a more agressive design and marketing strategy. That 90% figure was shrinking in the past couple of years, but I'm not so sure if that trend is continuing. It's kinda like the big SUV's. Very few people take them off road. And if BMW pushed harder for their clients to ride real adventures, then the feedback they received would hopefully push them to go back to the drawing board and reintroduce the dry clutch and enduro gearing, and maybe lose some weight. Or at least revive the other bikes that are more dirt oriented like the HP2.
  11. robday

    BMW R1200 GS (2006)

    0 comments

    Very good.
  12. robday

    BMW R1200 GS 2006

    Very good. It's been heavily modified: Touratech extended range fuel tanks Yacugar suspension Desierto3 fairing Happy Trails Teton panniers AltRider luggage rack Sargent seat Black Dog skidplate Rigid 6" Spectre light bar with Black Dog fork mounts ...and many other smaller accessories.
  13. robday

    BMW R1200 GS 2006

    2 reviews

    ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Displacement: 1170.00 ccm (71.39 cubic inches) Engine type: Two cylinder boxer, four-stroke Power: 96.55 HP (70.5 kW)) @ 7000 RPM Torque: 115.00 Nm (11.7 kgf-m or 84.8 ft.lbs) @ 5500 RPM Top speed: 200.0 km/h (124.3 mph) Compression: 11.0:1 Bore x stroke: 101.0 x 73.0 mm (4.0 x 2.9 inches) Valves per cylinder: 4 Fuel system: Injection. Electronic intake pipe injection/digital engine management: BMS-K with overrun fuel cut-off, dual ignition Fuel control: SOHC Cooling system: Oil & air Gearbox: 6-speed Transmission type, final drive: Shaft drive (cardan) Clutch: Single-disc dry clutch, hydraulically operated Fuel consumption: 4.50 litres/100 km (22.2 km/l or 52.27 mpg) Greenhouse gases: 104.4 CO2 g/km. (CO2 - Carbon dioxide emission) CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Frame type: Three-section frame consisting of front and rear section, load bearing engine-gearbox unit Rake (fork angle): 27.1° Trail: 110 mm (4.3 inches) Front suspension: BMW Motorrad Telelever Front suspension travel: 41 mm (1.6 inches) Rear suspension: Die-cast aluminium single-sided swinging arm with BMW Motorrad Paralever Rear suspension travel: 135 mm (5.3 inches) Front tyre: 110/80-ZR19 Rear tyre: 150/70-ZR17 Front brakes: Double disc Front brakes diameter: 305 mm (12.0 inches) Rear brakes: Double disc Rear brakes diameter: 265 mm (10.4 inches) PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Dry weight: 199.0 kg (438.7 pounds) Weight incl. oil, gas, etc: 225.0 kg (496.0 pounds) Power/weight ratio: 0.4852 HP/kg Seat height: 840 mm (33.1 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Overall height: 1,430 mm (56.3 inches) Overall length: 2,210 mm (87.0 inches) Overall width: 915 mm (36.0 inches) Wheelbase: 1,520 mm (59.8 inches) Fuel capacity: 20.00 litres (5.28 gallons) OTHER SPECIFICATIONS Starter: Electric
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