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Bearded-vstromrider

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Bearded-vstromrider last won the day on August 9 2018

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About Bearded-vstromrider

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    www.beardedvstromrider.com

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Netherlands
  • Interests
    V-strom, adventure riding, motorcycle sports, camping.

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  1. Bearded-vstromrider

    Enduristan Blizzard L & Base Packs 6.5

    Sorry for the late reply.... @Stara__Varos Here's some pictures of the bike loaded.
  2. Bearded-vstromrider

    Footpegs: The Most Overlooked Performance Upgrade?

    certainly a good upgrade to do... I changed my stock V-strom 650 pegs for the Touratech pegs. Quite a difference!
  3. Bearded-vstromrider

    V-strom on a race track?

    CRE race track experience! Time, 05:15 h. My alarm clock rings and it’s time for me to get my breakfast in my stomach, take a shower and jump on my bike! The 1,5 hour drive to the TT race track in Assen took me to the TT junior track and the CRT Holland training ground for the CRE track training. Here I met with 37 fellow Suzuki riders. Greeting us where the men and women from Suzuki Motors Holland who set up this training day. Briefing Before we could start melting our tyres and scratching our footpegs on the asphalt. We needed to get a safety briefing. This CRE safety briefing included the meaning of the different flags that signal what you need to do on the track in case of any changes. Also they told us not to stop to help someone who crashes. This felt kind of unnatural to me but it made perfect sense. Better to have one person on the ground then a whole pile up on the track. After being set to the proper mindset, CRE gave us our rider number. 60 blue was my sign. They put us in 4 different groups coded by colour, for the training on the Junior Track. This part of the day was there to make us proficient in cornering. It also made us explore the capabilities of the bike. TT junior track The junior track is a way smaller but way more corner intense track than the actual TT track. The track consists of a South and North loop. These loops are riddled with corners and turns which will make you flinch at first glance. The CRE instructors take you round and around the South and North loops. Turning the flinching into smiling! In total you’ll ride 8 stretches of 10 minute rounds. CRE instruction proves it’s worth! Photo by: wegraceinfo.nl After about 5 minutes the CRE instructor gets off and you have to find your own perfect lines and curve entries. This really makes you think about the cornering, throttle and braking. And this makes you better! I personally went from 0.659 degrees decline to scratching my footpegs around the corners in about 2 rounds. So this means you still have 6 rounds of 10 minutes to train your new skills. The CRE instructor gives you personal feedback on your riding style and this makes for a good ride all day long! He told me, that if I wanted to keep some pegs to stand on, I should lean into the curve more with my body. He told me to sit on the side of my saddle. If I felt like Rossi or Marquez, I should even lean in more. But! Never exceed your comfort zone to much he said. The CRE instructor motto: “Push the envelope, but keep it fun and real”. The Big Track After nice lunch, we enter the afternoon CRE programme. This included a little bit of theory about the TT Assen Race Track, and another safety briefing. Directly after that we were sent down to pick up our transponders and let them get mounted on your bikes. These transponders send back your laptime but also monitor your Decibel output. Legally on the TT you are only allowed to ride with an exhaust that emits a maximum of 101Db. If you exceed this they will flag you with a black flag and end your trip with a heat-seeking missile. Before we could enter the track we needed to split up again in groups. At the Parc Fermé we arranged these groups and we were the first ones to ride! I followed my CRE instructor onto the track and started slamming my V-strom into the track curves. Photo by: wegraceinfo.nl But sadly, as good as my high seated, broad handlebar and manoeuvrable Strom handled on the Junior track. It wasn’t powerful enough to reach any real speed on the track. I thought this would get boring then… But man was I wrong. Fun all over! Finding the ideal line of entry, exiting curves full power and ramming through chicanes at 90 km/h. Awesome! Strubben At the TT race track I found my Nemesis. The curve called Strubben. The first few tries it bit me hard. I couldn’t get the right angle, speed and driveline to get through it. But with some coaching from the CRE instructor and my fellow riders, I was able to get it done! I can’t imagine how they do this with speed exceeding 100-200km….. Verdict: Satisfaction It was a very long and very intense day. My legs hurt, knees ached and my back is blown. But it was all so satisfying. I’ve learned to trust my bike that much more now and above all.. I trust myself more. I for one, am now a lot more confident on my bike. Both me and my Strom can do so much more than I thought. I can recommend a CRE or CRT training to anyone. No matter what bike you ride. You don’t have to be fast or take the corners the best. You just have to be the best you can be on your own bike. Video of V-strom on Race Track.
  4. Finally packed to head off to Switserland. This Enduristan Blizzard L saddlebags, fitted with two Base Packs can really haul some gear! - 2 pers Tent - sleeping mat - Toiletries - hoodie sweater - extra coolwear for under my suit - 3 pairs of socks and 3 pairs of boxers - KLiM baseball cap - Emergency lighting - Petzl headlight - WakaWakaLight solar powerbank - set of batteries - normal powerbank - phone charger / GoPro charger - 2x Gopro, spare phone, TomTom rider In an addition to that i have two Enduristan Base Packs mounted to my crash bars. Containing: - Chainlube / cleaner - reflective vest - motorcycle specific tools - summer and all- season gloves - extra cables for brakes / throttle - rope, duct- tape, electrical tape - zip ties - 4x ROK Straps - The ultimate stretch strap What do you carry on a trip?
  5. Bearded-vstromrider

    Cleaning your gear with Ozone

    Ahh. Never seen that spray! Do you have a link?
  6. Ozone disinfects, Yesterday i got my gear disinfected with Ozone gas. I'm pretty happy with the results. No more nasty smells and my gear even smells like the air smells after a heavy thunderstorm. How does Ozone do its job? The chemical name is O3. Which basically means that it has three oxygen atoms form a Ozone-molecule and it would love to set one atom free and return to its O2 state. That’s why it reacts with bacteria and viruses and destroys their outer shell. The Ozone keeps on attacking the outer shell until the bacteria or virus breaks up and is no more! It neutralizes the smells that bacteria produce by reacting with that as well. It turns the smells into harmless and odourless CO2. Can I produce Ozone myself? If you can rub two pieces of carpet really fast against each other you just might… It takes an electrical shock of about 10-20 KiloVolt to make Ozone molecules. So Keep rubbing! Ozone also occurs naturally in the air after a thunder storm. The smell that’s in the air after that is the Ozone you smell! This smell also lingers in your helmet for a few minutes before the Ozone has totally reacted with its environment. Want to see a reasonable boring video about the process? Check it out here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?list=UUoI7-iw2XhT-TSj-TUky0uQ&v=7Pay8arcvls More on www.beardedvstromrider.com this sunday
  7. Bearded-vstromrider

    MotoGP in Holland

    We were invited by Suzuki Holland to check out the MotoGP at TT-ASSEN. Valentino Rossi won this race (again). Im really an adventurebike guy but you can't tell me you guys don't get goosebumps when you hear that Supermoto sound! Bearded_vstromrider Youtube at the MotoGP motoGP TT Assen 2017.mp4 beardedvstromrider.com at the MotoGP
  8. Bearded-vstromrider

    Pirelli Scorpion Trail

    I'm riding the Pirelli Scorpion Trail II. Pirelli wanted to make a good, solid allroad tyre. The rear tyre thread is made of a compound material with a high about of silica in there. The front tyre thread is made of single compound material with 100% silica. Pirelli wanted you to have grip in dry and wet conditions. They also wanted you to ride around with a pretty thread. Pirelli even cut in a little scorpion symbol in the tyre and placed a nice red one on the walls of the tyre. The Pirelli Scorpion Trail II makes it a little easier to slam your bike into the corners. This could also make you feel a little unsure in the beginning. It has the tendency to “fall” into the corner and it feels a bit slippy this way. But it catches you very quickly and you can open the throttle nice and good coming out of the corner section. Full review: BEARDED_VSTROMRIDER
  9. Bearded-vstromrider

    The need for speed(o)s

    Yeah just oldskool it man. Guessing when it all runs out haha
  10. Bearded-vstromrider

    Allroad helmets

    Nice! Ja kan makkelijker maar dan snappen ze het hier op het forum niet meer
  11. Bearded-vstromrider

    Allroad helmets

    Cool! Thanks for the feedback. Very nice pictures dude! Groeten uit Utrecht!
  12. Bearded-vstromrider

    What do you carry for 1-2 day rides?

    Back pack / saddle bag One set of (non-smelly, non-biker) clothing Spare knickers for the rest of the trip BIVI-bag incl. sleeping bag. set of camp shoes. Enduristan Basepacks (mounted on crashbars): Left: Med kit (bandages / Israeli bandage / mouth-to-mouth kit / painkillers / disinfectant / little bottle of whiskey foot pump WAKA WAKA powerbank (solar charge) Right: Some hand-tools and spare bolts and zip-ties Duct tape and electrical tape Chain cleaner / lube Fold-able shower bag ( Only when i'm planning on camping near water, heaven! ) In/on my jacket: Cell phone spare map Petzl light spare keys hydration pack.
  13. Bearded-vstromrider

    The need for speed(o)s

    Whow! sorry man haven't got any suggestions for you. But i'm curious how you solve it
  14. Bearded-vstromrider

    Allroad helmets

    How did it preform? Im also in the market for a new helmet. And i would love a more 'adventure' type of helmet with a little bit more chin space on account of my beard
  15. Bearded-vstromrider

    7 add-ons for the adventure bike

    I've made a little list of all the gear you would have to add onto your adventure bike before it's kind of offroad worthy. Let me know what else you would add! The adventure bike. Most adventure bikes are made for the occasional off-road path and track but are mainly designed to be a good tourer. That is why most bikes have ‘weak spots’ when it comes to adventure travel. Luckily there are loads of add- ons you can buy to guard your bike! Of course some adventure bikes are more equipped for the off-road segment than others. For example the BMW GS series are mostly designed to have some parts of the bike tucked away so you might need less add-ons on those bikes. But they come with a higher price tag than for example the Suzuki V-strom. Which would comparing apples to oranges though. Crash bars. Crash bars are perhaps the most basic protection upgrade you should make. Not only are they good to keep more room between the bike and your leg in a fall. They also protect the side of your bike for any damage. Crash bars are not only good to have off-road. I’ve used mine some pretty stupid tip-overs a few times before. Scratches on your crash bars hurt less than on your bike Engine guard. Riding thru an off-road track with some potholes or a waterhole with some unexpected stones. Both could be destructive on your engines underside, exhaust pipes or oil filter. A good engine guard will take the brunt of the force and make sure your engine survives most of the hits it gets. What are you looking for in a good engine guard? It has to have enough connection points to your bike to spread the blow on when it takes a hit. You don’t want to end up with a half loose engine guard out in the field. Look at the material and the thickness of the material the engine guard is made of. Check if this meets your needs on your travels. I don’t need to explain to you that you need an engine guard with some more meat when you hit the hard tracks. Radiator guard. Some bikes might not need this. My V-strom is not one of those. The radiator is quite exposed and vulnerable for sticks and stones to break its bones. I already have a few dings in it before I installed the guard. Your radiator could lose effectiveness and even leak, when it has too much dings. Also when you ride through the bush and you manage to ride through some brushes, the twigs might puncture your radiator. although that would be an extreme… its nice not to have it happen on a trip. Hand guards. I think that on 90% of the adventure bikes for sale today these are standard. And if not… get them! This could be the difference between a trip through the back roads and a trip to the E.R. Branches, trees, rocks everything that can crush your fingers are free to do so without these guards. Adjusted or upgraded suspension. It’s pretty hard for manufacturers to size up their average customer. That’s why they just put the suspension to what they think is their average rider. This is almost never the case. You will be riding with luggage, water, food and maybe a few pounds more than the average 80 kg of bodyweight. Because of this it is good to adjust your suspension to your own riding habit. Adjusting this isn’t something you do once and then can forget about. It is recommended to do this before every long trip you take. Unless your riding weight will be about the same. Curious how to set your preload? Check out this video for one of the options. Some bikes don’t have enough preload on them to give you the right amount for every ride. Or they just have crappy suspension. If this is the case it is a good idea to check out if you can upgrade your suspension by slamming a new one in there. Wider and rougher foot-pegs. My V-strom came equipped with sturdy, small, rubber lines pegs. These start to hurt after a while standing on them on an off-road track. Also they get slippery when wet or dirty. Not ideal if you’re tracking a bumpy road while standing on them. That’s why I replaced mine with wider and rougher total metal foot-pegs. Don't know how you replace foot-pegs? Just take a look here then. Auxiliary lights. Chances are that where you are heading, there are no streetlights. Still you want to look as far forward and as wide as you possibly can. This way you can anticipate to potholes, trees, branches, your fellow riders and critters. That’s why it could be very handy to mount some auxiliary lights like these 4XLED Supermini’s I mounted on my V-strom. I bought mine at: ALLROADMOTO Do you want to check out the review first? Click here to check out the full-review. Well this is again such a subject where everyone had their own preference. So let me know what your top 7 would be. More articles on: BEARDED_VSTROMRIDER
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