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Found 826 results

  1. I'd like this thread to be a place where we can put videos of big bikes being ridden well. Videos you look at and you're like "wow, I wish I could ride like that!" Something like this... or
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    New toy May 2018!
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    Man... I wanted this to be a 5* bike, but I can only give it a 4* rating. Suspension is holding it back... I bought this bike to replace my 2008 R1200GSA as a more streetable bike than my 2009 KTM 950 Super Enduro. It is that... for sure. It has WP suspension similar to my 950, but it has nearly 4 inches less travel. There is not much adjustment... I have tweaked it a lot... and just can't get it right. Other than that, this bike is GREAT. Ergos are great. Power is amazing. Neat machine.
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    I friggin love it!
  5. I installed these today...
  6. Ok, l o n g time dirt bike guy turned ADV n00b late last spring. My questions is, when you are doing major DIY service, suspension work, or tire changes, how are you securing your bike in an upright position in the shop/garage/man cave? I have my ideas, but I'd like to see how you guys are doing it. I'd like to install some more aggressive tires and suspension mods (springs & valving) this spring. Bike is a 13 Tiger 800XC with no center stand. Since the big has a trellis frame (no lower frame rails), any issue resting the entire weight of the bike on the the oil pan? I ASS-U-ME not, but that's why I'm asking. Thanks in advance for your help XLADV'rs!
  7. 0 comments

    Best motorcycle I've owned. Only drawback I've found is too many electronic gizmos. Don't get me wrong, the electronics are WONDERFUL but when they fail, you aren't left with many onsite repair options.
  8. A bit about a Previous Hot Springs Adventure Tour https://advtours.com/previous-events/ Video from Previous Hot Springs Tour Sept 2018 Ride https://advtours.com/hot-springs-tour/ Previous Event Videos http://www.coloradodualsport.com/home/about-us/previous-events
  9. I went last year for the first time and it was a lot of fun. There is a lot of great riding over there and camping and partying with hundreds of other ADV enthusiasts is a blast. There are many vendors with all kinds of cool products from little gizmos to whole motorcycles you can try out. There are some great learning opportunities with Jimmy Lewis, Dirt First, and PSSOR doing classes. There is a huge tent area for those riding in, but also an RV area if you want to trailer in too. They offer guided tours for any skill level, or you can just make up your own using the supplied GPS maps. There is food, beer, and gas available right across the street, but those great vendors usually have a keg flowing in the evening. Last year there were about 800 people making it the largest ADV rally in the US, I believe. This year they are going to actually limit attendance to about 1000 and early bird tickets sales end in February, so don't delay. https://www.touratechrally.com/ See you there!, Pete
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    My roots are in road racing so I had to get a supplemental ride. A SuperDuke 990. But since that is not an option for MY GARAGE, I tagged it on with my new 690.
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    Amazing machine. I've noticed its not as high quality as a BMW but its definitely built for my riding style. KTM has come short on my deal and hasn't activated KTM my ride, hill assist, quick shift, or heated grips. They don't know how to make these options work. It's been a month sense I bought the bike and I haven't got to fully use my bike yet.
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    I'm Super Pumped like Ryan Dungey! 😂
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    Saying that I am in love with this bike would be an understatement. Out of all the motorcycles I have owned throughout the years, the 1290 SA has been my favorite. Modifications: Rottweiler Stage 3 Intake Kit Blackdog Skid Plate Cyclops LED Headlights Cyclops LED Lightbar Mosko Moto Backcountry Bags Blackdog Oil Cooler Guard Rottweiler Stage 2 SAS and Canister Delete Rottweiler CRG Mirros Rox Risers Sagent Custom Seats SW Motech Rear Master Cylinder Guard
  14. 0 comments

    The baseline for large dirt bikes.
  15. Today I'm going to take my old and busted shocks off and replace with new ones! Joy! Seriously, this will take me probably more than a day and probably a six pack of beer for a friend to come help The rear shock is super easy but the front is tricky. You have to take the lower crashbars off and then raise the bike either with like a bucket under the skid plate or by lifting it from a cable/pulley from your garage ceiling. The trick is to get the telelever to fall far enough down to get the front shock out. Then reinstalling the crashbars is always fun I promise to post pics, bloody knuckles and all.
  16. 2 comments

    I've been riding this exquisite bike since 2015. I came to it from a Yamaha Super Tenere XT1200 and a DRZ400S (which I still own as a backup for buddies who want to ride with me, but are "bike-orphaned"). The 690 Enduro is the perfect compromise between the weight benefits of the DRZ and the power of the Tenere. I can't sing the 690's praise enough. It is a blast to cruise down the freeway at a steady 80 mph, or drift through the Santa Monica mountain twisties, or goat-whip it up some gnarly trail at Big Bear or Cleveland national forest. Don't listen to those who say it can't keep up with the heavyweights on long-distance rides. It most certainly can, especially with the right aftermarket seat or - even better - an Airhawk seat pad stretched over the Sweet Cheeks bottle carrier (increases fuel capacity by a couple of liters). The bike's only drawback is that it is not ideal for tight single-tracks which involved sharp, rising switchbacks, due to its relatively ungenerous turning angle. Apart from that, it is a far less stressful bike to take into difficult terrain than the 500 lb adventure machines we love on the freeways. With only 320 lbs to cart around, it is quite nimble. The torque is ridiculously neck-snapping and always induces an insane grin in city riding and on steep, rocky hills. I keep thinking I should get a 240 lb exc, but I'm lazy and useless with tools, so the incredibly low-maintenance schedules keep me on this reliable beast's haunches. The only thing that might get me to trade it in is the forthcoming 790 middleweight from KTM or the T7 under development from Yamaha. I don't ever see myself going back to a 500 lb+ bike... the bulk and limitations of those behemoths just isn't worth tolerating when you can ride a thoroughbred stallion, drop it a dozen times while riding solo and never worry about picking it up, or having it fall on you in a ditch.
  17. I'm not sure if my XRR fits the category, but she is my current Adventure bike. I use it mostly for single day outings and prefer to play race on fireroads, but it will also handle tight single track, though it is more work than my KTM 250. It is plated and I think it is the best big dual sport combination of light weight, good power, and reliability. It has mild engine mods and put down about 52HP at the rear wheel. I also have a Rekluse auto clutch and rear hand brake, which I think are some of the greatest accessories available. I also own a Suzuki SV1000 street bike, but am looking to trade for a large/midsize ADV bike. I am looking forward to seeing the new Honda 1000 twin and hoping Yamaha release a Tenere based on the FZ-07 engine. Nothing currently available really lights my fire?! Here is a pic of my XRR:
  18. When i decide to kayak through my gs adventure 1200
  19. 0 comments

    2017DEC15: After many years of multiple bikes in the garage, I have gutted the garage and settled onto one bike--the Honda Africa Twin. This occurred in early August, 2017. During the first four months, my AT has been to KY, VA, NC, SC, and of course many places in TN. With the exception of about 25 miles, all have been pavement miles and the OEM street tires. So, now that the winter temperature are moving in, the AT has been sitting more than the Concours 14 would during these days. Why? Probably time available to ride which is now different (temporarily), but also maybe wind protection and heated grips. Really, though my riding gear is good, heated grips are here awaiting installation, and there is some nice engine heat flowing on the upper legs, but it could be more that the days are shorter and I am having to re-ride the same roads to get into the hilly areas that are about two hours east of here. For the winter riding in my area, the street tires will remain fitted. In the mean time some 60/40 Shinkos are in the garage and will be fitted as close to a departure for areas out west. Have never used Shinko tires, but figure I would try these once. So, about the bike. I like it! Engine power/torque is more than adequate. Gearing is fine for pavement, but too tall for out west. Having ridden many nice roads in the Appalachian mountains and the Cumberland plateau, and of course the Tail of the Dragon, I have to say the bike works well. From the start, I was not confident in the skinny front tire, but the rubber compound is soft and sticks well. The OEM handguards are not robust enough for tip-over impacts with the ground, so Bark Busters have been added. Also, since I like having trail spares, the OEM levers were moved to the E12 saddlebags for standby duty. Some blue anodized short levers from an eBay seller in China have been mounted. These are sturdy levers and more economical to use. I had an orange set on the 690R and they survived four tip-overs.
  20. Hey guys! My name is Scott and I'm a fairly new off road rider/seasoned photographer from Baltimore, MD. I was recently approached by BMW Motorrad to participate in their Everyday Adventures project, which is based around the ethos of exploring the best motorcycling places that are close to home. The project involved is posting content that reflects these endeavors, and the person who gains the most folllowers proportionate to where they started from is flown out to Motorrad Days in Germany! It would mean a lot if you all check out my content and give me a follow! Some of my work is attached below, and my Instagram is scottbraaplyphoto! IMG_3108.mp4
  21. SEATTLE, WA – October 18, 2016 – (Motor Sports Newswire) – Motorcycle accessory manufacturer AltRider is now stocking their DualControl Brake System for the 2016-17 Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin. This innovative device offers riders better control over their rear brake lever in both seated and standing positions, making it an ideal upgrade for adventure riders looking to leave the pavement. AltRider’s DualControl Brake System provides quick access to the Africa Twin’s rear brake, no matter what position the rider is in. “Most ADV riders change their foot position as they switch between standing and sitting,” explained AltRider Founder Jeremy LeBreton. “If your foot is not situated properly on the rear brake pedal, you’re potentially doubling reaction time and stopping distance, which can be especially hazardous when riding off-road. The DualControl Brake System aims to correct that problem so riders can maintain control over the rear brake at all times.” AltRider’s patent-pending DualControl Brake System features two pieces to help enhance a rider’s control and reaction time: a riser and an enlarger plate. When a rider transitions from a seated position to a standing position, the change in angle tends to bring the front of the foot higher and further away from the rear brake lever. The riser was designed to provide quick access to the rear brake, no matter what position the rider is in. The enlarger plate was designed to combat the effects of off-road terrain on the rider’s footpeg position. This piece provides a greater surface area to minimize slips or misses in bumpy riding conditions. With both pieces installed, the DualControl Brake System helps Africa Twin riders improve reaction time and control over the rear brake lever. Features Include: Patent pending design 25.4mm tall riser is constructed of billet aluminum Billet aluminum enlarger plate is precision fit to the Africa Twin Replaceable grip pins provide traction in all conditions Riser and enlarger available separately or as a kit Installs easily with included stainless steel hardware Available in silver or black finish 100% designed and manufactured in the USA] The AltRider DualControl Brake System is 100% engineered and manufactured in the United States. The riser and enlarger are offered separately or as a kit, and are available in a silver or black finish. AltRider DualControl Brake Systems are available at www.AltRider.com and through authorized AltRider dealers. About AltRider.com From their vast catalog of American-made protection pieces and other accessories to their annual signature rides, AltRider is all about giving riders the freedom of adventure. The Seattle-based company designs, tests and manufactures its products to function well, look good on the bike, and stand up to brutal riding conditions. Learn more at www.altrider.com.