Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Bmw'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Inside XLADV
    • Help Desk
    • KTM 990 Bike Build
  • General
    • Staging Area
    • Ride Reports
    • Pictures and Video
    • Big Girls Don’t Cry
    • Adventure Touring
    • Racing
    • Wrenching
    • GPS
    • Gear, Farkles and Equipment
    • Beyond Starbucks
  • Big Bikes
    • Which bike should I buy?
    • Make/Model Specific
    • Big Bike Tech
  • Regional
    • United States
    • International
  • Marketplace
    • Classifieds

Products Categories

Vehicles Categories

Garages

Blogs

  • Eric Hall's Blog
  • The Great American Trek
  • Blog della Motostella
  • EarthRider's Blog
  • Ballisticexchris' Blog
  • PNWTenere's Blog
  • Nate J.'s Blog
  • Erx Blog
  • peterpaul's Blog
  • Choice of Your Bet
  • Julia Johnsons' Blog
  • ridingfullcircle's Blog
  • One Wheel Wheatley

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests

Found 207 results

  1. PICKERINGTON, Ohio -- Twenty different BMW motorcycle models will be available for AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days attendees to demo for free, July 10-12 at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio, courtesy of BMW Motorrad. "We recently launched five new models and are proud to offer them and many more for attendees of AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days to demo," said Sarah Schilke, BMW Motorrad national marketing manager. "BMW has a huge line-up this year and this event will be a great place for riders to determine which of our many different models best fits their riding style." Bikes available to demo include the R 1200 series and the S 1000 line, the GS Adventure models, K 1300 and K 1600 touring models and the popular the R nineT. Rides will leave between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Friday, July 10, through Sunday, July 12. All riders are required to provide: Valid driver's license showing a current motorcycle endorsement DOT-approved helmet and eye protection Long pants Long sleeve shirt Gloves Over-the-ankle boots To ride any of the models, riders must be at least 21 years old. For models rated with more than 125 horsepower, the minimum age is 25 years. Passengers are permitted, but must wear all required protective equipment. For 2015, AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days is celebrating the 25th anniversary of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum. AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days is a fundraiser for the facility, which houses the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame and other thematic exhibits that celebrate motorcycling's heritage. The museum was founded in 1990 to provide a permanent home to the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame, which celebrates and preserves the rich tradition of motorcycling in America through the recognition of the sport's greatest heroes. Proceeds from AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days are donated to the American Motorcycle Heritage Foundation, a 501©(3) non-profit organization tasked with funding the operation of the museum and Hall of Fame activities. AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days is the home of the AMA Vintage Grand Championship, which includes road racing, motocross, hare scrambles, trials and dirt-track racing. Another top attraction is North America's largest motorcycle swap meet with parts, bikes and memorabilia from all eras. Bike shows bring out examples of some of history's most beloved motorcycles, while stunt shows, such as the American Motor Drome Wall of Death, and demo rides of current production bikes keep attendees entertained. Seminars feature some of the country's leading experts on numerous motorcycling topics. It all adds up to one of motorcycling's premier events. Learn more, see photos and read stories from past AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days at www.amavintagemotorcycledays.com. To receive the latest news and updates about AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days, see www.americanmotorcyclist.com/vmdupdates or search for the hashtag #AMAVMD on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.
  2. Anyone else see this oxidation of their paralever arm? I saw this on Rich's bike and they said at the dealer it's a known issue. I just thought it was a copper color on purpose.
  3. This should apply to the GS as well and to all the oilhead models. No pics (yet) but I am happy to report no bloody knuckles. I got one minor scratch on my right middle finger. For anyone looking to change their front shock (rear is pretty easy), here's how to do it... First you want to remove your lower engine guards. This can be a challenge for some because the top fasteners tend to be hard to get to and loosen without stripping. Then you wan to remove the alternator belt cover. Why? Because it gets in the way of pulling out the shock and putting the new one in later. Next you want to remove a screw holding the front brake line on the right side of the bike. If you don't do this then you won't have slack to droop the front suspension low enough to get the shock out. It's tight in there and I found an L-shaped torx from my tool kit was the best solution. You have to somehow jack the bike up from the skid plate but with the rear still on the ground. I was able to lift it (with a friend) on top of my pannier, but a floor jack is probably ideal and safer. I also secured the bike with a strap from the middle of the handlebars to a hook firmly screwed into a beam in the roof of my garage. Then remove the top tank panel, as well as the two side panels and gas cap (four black screws). I put a rag in the tank opening so those screws holding the gas cap on don't accidentally fall in. Leave the front screws on the side plastic pieces secure; just take off the other two. These are just metal panels; it's really not that hard. Remember the longer screws go in that middle hole of the side plastic pieces. The rest should be roughly the same length. At this point you should be able to put a socket on the top bolt of the shock and take that top nut off. If you have a nifty ratcheting box-end wrench then you may be able to get away with not removing the top tank panel. It might be 15mm or 17 mm or in my case 11/16ths". Not a lot of room to work with. Keep the top bushing/spacer and remember to put it back on top of the new shock later. Remove the lower shock bolt from the right side. At this point, the shock should fall out of the top bracket and come loose from the lower mount. If it doesn't come loose from the lower mount, you can knock it back with a rubber mallet or something until it comes free. Also be sure to keep the rubber bushings and/or spacer that goes on top of the shock but below the top bracket. Then simply put the new shock in but make sure you put the top rubber washer below the bracket back on the new shock. Put the top end in first, then you can slide it forward and down into the lower shock mount. Tighten down the lower shock bolt to 30 ft/lbs/40 Nm and some blue loctite. At this point you can lower your bike back to the floor and on its center stand. Make sure the top of the shock is properly seated through the hole in the bracket. Place that other rubber washer you removed from your other shock on top and then secure with the top nut. I put a bit of blue loctite on it. Tighten down to 25 ft/lbs/34 Nm. Ah, but the shock turns when you try to tighten it! At first I tried a strap wrench but it wasn't really gripping. I finally found the crescent wrench from my tool bag (or 19mm open end wrench) would fit on the very top nut below the top bracket and prevent the shock from turning when you're tightening it. Yes, you will need the assistance of a buddy (two man job). Then you can put the alternator cover back on (not a bad time to consider changing your belt if it's been on there for more than 24K miles), as well as re-secure the front brake line on the right side. Then put your lower engine bars back on. That also can be a challenge and take two sets of hands and maybe some straps to pull the upper bars into alignment so you can attach them to the lower bars.
  4. It all started in June of ’14. I found out I had a few days of vacation to use or lose at work, and at the last minute (3 days before departure) I decided to take a few days off and do a ride from Salt Lake City up through Yellowstone National park to Montana, and then back down through Idaho and back to Salt Lake. I called one of my riding buddies, he jumped on his Harley, and off we went. A motley pair - Me on my Tenere, and him on his Harley. There was no plan. It was ride, find a place to camp, ride, repeat. On day 1 we rode from Salt Lake up past Jackson Hole Wyoming with plans to camp in an ‘un-reserveable’ campground right outside the South entrance of Yellowstone. Well, as things sometimes go we found the un-reserveable campground not only full but half reserved. We rode around the loop of the campground once, and then started to ride the loop again just in case we’d missed something. As we rounded a corner on the second circuit of the campground this crazy German guy in a Touratech riding suit came bounding out of the bushes holding up his hand for us to stop. We did, and he began to inform us that the campground was full, but we we’re welcome to share his campspot with him and his wife! What luck! We quickly agreed, and thus a long-standing friendship was born with Claudia and Mirko of http://www.2ar.eu. 2 Adventure riders on the ride of their lives through the Americas on a charity Mission. We ended up spending the next few days with them as we explored Yellowstone, but I won’t get into that in this account. It was decided in those days that we would meet again in the Fall as they made their way back South from Canada to central America - we’d meet back up in Salt Lake City and do a tour of Southern Utah! Throughout the rest of the Summer I planned the Southern Utah Tour, figured out the routes we would take, and in early October Claudia and Mirko showed up with John Colyer of https://www.facebook.com/anomalyadv in tow. We spent a week in Salt Lake getting everybody ready, and then off we went - South for a planned 9 day tour of 6 National Parks - Zion, Bryce, Escalante, Capital Reef, Arches, And Canyonlands (Moab). It turned into 10 days however, as it got really windy on the day we we’re supposed to ride back to Salt Lake from Moab, and we all felt that was a good enough excuse to extend the trip another day! Hahaha. I won’t bore you with a long-winded account of the trip. That’s what video is for! Here’s a rather long, 15 minute account of the trip. Obviously you can’t fit 10 days of fun and adventure into a 15 minute video, but this was the best I could do! Enjoy! Oh, and if anyone wants to enjoy this route themselves HIT ME UP!!!! I’d be more than happy to do it again with a group, and I won’t even charge a tour-guide fee! Or, if you're interested, I can provide some links/coordinates of camping and trails along the route.
  5. I was going to start the thread with a I've been doing a lot of LDR lately (Long Distance Riding, duh!) and I need more gas crap, but to be honest, I love how the extra fuel canister looks on my bike. The problem I had is that I didn't want to the rotopax to be on the sides or the back but on top of the side aluminum cases. Right under my Wolfman rollie bags. But there was no way to strap them properly so I had to improvise. Total cost of project: $15 Total man hours spent: 1 Total beers consumed: 3 Industrial Revolution Vanilla Porter (I love living in CO) Enjoy! Your standard ADV side case Your standard BMW straps Using the Wolfman rollie alone with the straps: perfect! Using the Wolfman rollie and the rotopax with the straps: disaster! The rotopax will just fly away with the slightest bump. The solution: Footman Loops for next to nothing (here) I also needed some STAINLESS STEEL hardware as well as some pieces of an old bicycle tube Marking the “G” spot Measurements because OCD Am I actually drilling a hole on my sidecar? I wonder if this will void the warranty… The tube will help the water to stay out (in theory) Screw -> hook -> washer -> tube in this order Thank the OCD for measuring… How did I make it crooked? Screw tight (boom, phrasing!) Cut the edges. Final product And here’s the magic! Yes, these are the original straps that came with my bike… This rotopax, won’t go anywhere! Not bad, right? http://i.imgur.com/9yhErV9.jpg Best think, I can still open my side cases with everything on them! Now I’m ready to go to my local Starbucks. Oh wait, I’ve got extra fuel! I can go to the one across town!! WOOHOO!!!! This post has been promoted to an article
  6. Scotty Breauxman writes for Adventure Motorcycle Magazine as well as promotes an event called Baja Rally. I first met Scotty at AltRider's Taste of Dakar in 2013 and have since run into him again in Baja as well as the last Taste of Dakar in Mar of this past year. http://www.adventuremotorcycle.com/reviews/24-reviews/bikes/699-bikes-project-2014-bmwf800gs-urm#.VK71jSvF_To He had this BMW F800 GS put together and billed it as "The Ultimate Adventure Riding Machine" with some help from BMW Motorcycles of Escondido, AltRider, Konflict Suspension, Woody's Wheels, etc... When I saw him at the TOD event earlier this year he said he'd just picked the bike up the day before and was excited to ride it. He said with the suspension, damper and Flexx bars that he called his "butter bike." There's many interesting comments on that page like how it's still way too heavy, too expensive, etc... At some point I'd like to do something similar, like an XLADV project bike. We're obviously don't (yet) have the reach of an ADVMoto to attract sponsors like that but I'm sure it won't be too long
  7. 0 comments

    Best motorcycle I've owned. Only drawback I've found is too many electronic gizmos. Don't get me wrong, the electronics are WONDERFUL but when they fail, you aren't left with many onsite repair options.
  8. 0 comments

    I had a '13 GSA 1200. It was too big for me. "Pick a standard 1200, no?" No, because I love the rugged bulkyness of the Adventure models. So...here's the new toy! A 2013 F800GSA, "sand beige" color, with only 16k KMs, and full optional: Full aluminium panniers set with BMW internal bags for the side panniers, heated grips, ESA, ABS/ASC, on-board computer, 2 riding modes (Road/Enduro), LED foglights, LED blinkers, and maybe even something else. Plus, the previous owner installed a couple toys that I would've installed anyway: crash bars for the "tank" (by GIVI), a bigger skidplate (GIVI again), and the expanded sidestand base (no idea who made it). After a full day of riding, I can say I'm VERY satisfied. Fuel consumption is ridicolously low, the bike's very comfortable (solo and with pillion), and most importantly, it's FIFTY KILOGRAMS lighter than both my previous GSA1200 and my ex-SuperTenere. I've only found 3 things I don't like on this bike: 1- Sound. Easily fixable with a proper exhaust. 2- Handguards. They leave half my hand exposed to air/cold. 3- Windscreen. It's big, but it leaves my head exposed. Again, I can easily fix all these "problems". Can't wait to ride more! :)
  9. 1 comment

    This is the largest bike I have ever owned. Love it. Very capable of long rides then jumping off road.
  10. 1 comment

    Love it! (more coming later)
  11. 0 comments

    Currently I have two ponies I keep in my stable " garage" 2008: F650GS Dakar & 2013 F800 GS. I traveled most of the South East Coast all last year totaling a good 28,000mls mostly solo on the F650.I wanted a larger engine and have recently (Mid December) purchased the F800gs For a RTW/West coast exploration. I'm still getting comfortable with the 800's weight (especially packed with camping gear). I have had the honor of training and riding with some of XLADV riders. I believe we are headed to Lake Berryessa this weekend. I feel this is a great start to another awesome big bike community!
  12. 0 comments

    If they could find a way to shave 50 pounds, it would be PERFECT!
  13. I was going to start the thread with a I've been doing a lot of LDR lately (Long Distance Riding, duh!) and I need more gas crap, but to be honest, I love how the extra fuel canister looks on my bike. The problem I had is that I didn't want to the rotopax to be on the sides or the back but on top of the side aluminum cases. Right under my Wolfman rollie bags. But there was no way to strap them properly so I had to improvise. Total cost of project: $15 Total man hours spent: 1 Total beers consumed: 3 Industrial Revolution Vanilla Porter (I love living in CO) Enjoy! Your standard ADV side case Your standard BMW straps Using the Wolfman rollie alone with the straps: perfect! Using the Wolfman rollie and the rotopax with the straps: disaster! The rotopax will just fly away with the slightest bump. The solution: Footman Loops for next to nothing (here) I also needed some STAINLESS STEEL hardware as well as some pieces of an old bicycle tube Marking the “G” spot Measurements because OCD Am I actually drilling a hole on my sidecar? I wonder if this will void the warranty… The tube will help the water to stay out (in theory) Screw -> hook -> washer -> tube in this order Thank the OCD for measuring… How did I make it crooked? Screw tight (boom, phrasing!) Cut the edges. Final product And here’s the magic! Yes, these are the original straps that came with my bike… This rotopax, won’t go anywhere! Not bad, right? Best thing, I can still open my side cases with everything on them! Now I’m ready to go to my local Starbucks. Oh wait, I’ve got extra fuel! I can go to the one across town!! WOOHOO!!!!
  14. 1 review

    ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Displacement: 1170.00 ccm (71.39 cubic inches) Engine type: Two cylinder boxer, two-stroke Power: 103.25 HP (75.4 kW)) @ 7500 RPM Torque: 115.00 Nm (11.7 kgf-m or 84.8 ft.lbs) @ 5750 RPM Compression: 12.0:1 Bore x stroke: 101.0 x 73.0 mm (4.0 x 2.9 inches) Valves per cylinder: 4 Fuel system: Injection. Electronic intake pipe injection/BMS-K digital engine management with overrun fuel cut-off, twin spark ignition Fuel control: SOHC Cooling system: Oil & air Gearbox: 6-speed Transmission type, final drive: Shaft drive (cardan) Clutch: Single dry plate clutch, hydraulically operated Fuel consumption: 4.30 litres/100 km (23.3 km/l or 54.70 mpg) Greenhouse gases: 99.8 CO2 g/km. (CO2 - Carbon dioxide emission) Exhaust system: Closed-loop 3-way catalytic converter, emission standard EU-3 CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Frame type: Two-section frame consisting of front and rear sections, load- bearing engine-gearbox unit Rake (fork angle): 25.7° Trail: 101 mm (4.0 inches) Front suspension: BMW Motorrad Telelever Front suspension travel: 190 mm (7.5 inches) Rear suspension: Cast aluminium single-sided swing arm with BMW Motorrad Paralever Rear suspension travel: 200 mm (7.9 inches) Front tyre: 110/80-R19 Rear tyre: 150/70-R17 Front brakes: Double disc Front brakes diameter: 305 mm (12.0 inches) Rear brakes: Single disc Rear brakes diameter: 265 mm (10.4 inches) PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Dry weight: 203.0 kg (447.5 pounds) Weight incl. oil, gas, etc: 229.0 kg (504.9 pounds) Power/weight ratio: 0.5086 HP/kg Seat height: 850 mm (33.5 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Overall height: 1,450 mm (57.1 inches) Overall length: 2,210 mm (87.0 inches) Overall width: 935 mm (36.8 inches) Wheelbase: 1,507 mm (59.3 inches) Fuel capacity: 20.00 litres (5.28 gallons) Reserve fuel capacity: 4.00 litres (1.06 gallons) OTHER SPECIFICATIONS Starter: Electric
  15. 0 reviews

    GENERAL INFORMATION Model: BMW HP2 Enduro Year: 2008 Category: Enduro / offroad Rating: 76 out of 100. ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Displacement: 1170.00 ccm (71.39 cubic inches) Engine type: Twin, four-stroke Power: 103.25 HP (75.4 kW)) @ 7000 RPM Torque: 115.00 Nm (11.7 kgf-m or 84.8 ft.lbs) @ 5500 RPM Compression: 11.0:1 Bore x stroke: 101.0 x 73.0 mm (4.0 x 2.9 inches) Valves per cylinder: 4 Fuel system: Injection. Electronic intake pipe injection/digital engine management: BMS-K with overrun fuel cut-off, dual ignition Fuel control: SOHC Cooling system: Oil & air Gearbox: 6-speed Transmission type, final drive: Shaft drive (cardan) Clutch: Single-disc dry clutch, hydraulically operated Fuel consumption: 4.10 litres/100 km (24.4 km/l or 57.37 mpg) Greenhouse gases: 95.1 CO2 g/km. (CO2 - Carbon dioxide emission) CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Frame type: Tubular steel space frame Rake (fork angle): 32.5° Trail: 157 mm (6.2 inches) Front suspension: WAD upside-down front fork, Ø 45 mm, compression damping continuously adjustable in two ranges, rebound damping adjustable Front suspension travel: 270 mm (10.6 inches) Rear suspension: Forged aluminium single-sided swinging arm with BMW Motorrad Paralever Rear suspension travel: 250 mm (9.8 inches) Front tyre: 90/90-21 Rear tyre: 140/80-17 Front brakes: Single disc Front brakes diameter: 305 mm (12.0 inches) Rear brakes: Single disc Rear brakes diameter: 265 mm (10.4 inches) PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Dry weight: 175.0 kg (385.8 pounds) Weight incl. oil, gas, etc: 195.0 kg (429.9 pounds) Power/weight ratio: 0.5900 HP/kg Seat height: 920 mm (36.2 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Overall height: 1,266 mm (49.8 inches) Overall length: 2,350 mm (92.5 inches) Overall width: 880 mm (34.6 inches) Wheelbase: 1,610 mm (63.4 inches) Fuel capacity: 13.00 litres (3.43 gallons)
  16. 0 reviews

    GENERAL INFORMATION Model: BMW HP2 Enduro Year: 2009 Category: Enduro / offroad Rating: 71 out of 100. ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Displacement: 1170.00 ccm (71.39 cubic inches) Engine type: Twin, four-stroke Power: 103.25 HP (75.4 kW)) @ 7000 RPM Torque: 115.00 Nm (11.7 kgf-m or 84.8 ft.lbs) @ 5500 RPM Compression: 11.0:1 Bore x stroke: 101.0 x 73.0 mm (4.0 x 2.9 inches) Valves per cylinder: 4 Fuel system: Injection. Electronic intake pipe injection/digital engine management: BMS-K with overrun fuel cut-off, dual ignition Fuel control: SOHC Cooling system: Oil & air Gearbox: 6-speed Transmission type, final drive: Shaft drive (cardan) Clutch: Single-disc dry clutch, hydraulically operated Fuel consumption: 4.10 litres/100 km (24.4 km/l or 57.37 mpg) Greenhouse gases: 95.1 CO2 g/km. (CO2 - Carbon dioxide emission) CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Frame type: Tubular steel space frame Rake (fork angle): 32.5° Trail: 157 mm (6.2 inches) Front suspension: WAD upside-down front fork, Ø 45 mm, compression damping continuously adjustable in two ranges, rebound damping adjustable Front suspension travel: 270 mm (10.6 inches) Rear suspension: Forged aluminium single-sided swinging arm with BMW Motorrad Paralever Rear suspension travel: 250 mm (9.8 inches) Front tyre: 90/90-21 Rear tyre: 140/80-17 Front brakes: Single disc Front brakes diameter: 305 mm (12.0 inches) Rear brakes: Single disc Rear brakes diameter: 265 mm (10.4 inches) PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Dry weight: 175.0 kg (385.8 pounds) Weight incl. oil, gas, etc: 195.0 kg (429.9 pounds) Power/weight ratio: 0.5900 HP/kg Seat height: 920 mm (36.2 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Overall height: 1,266 mm (49.8 inches) Overall length: 2,350 mm (92.5 inches) Overall width: 880 mm (34.6 inches) Wheelbase: 1,610 mm (63.4 inches) Fuel capacity: 13.00 litres (3.43 gallons) OTHER SPECIFICATIONS Color options: Indigo Blue Metallized / Alaska Grey
  17. 0 reviews

    GENERAL INFORMATION Model: BMW G 650 GS Sertao Year: 2013 Category: Enduro / offroad Rating: 61.5 out of 100 ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Displacement: 652.00 ccm (39.79 cubic inches) Engine type: Single cylinder, four-stroke Power: 48.00 HP (35.0 kW)) @ 6500 RPM Torque: 60.00 Nm (6.1 kgf-m or 44.3 ft.lbs) @ 5000 RPM Top speed: 169.0 km/h (105.0 mph) Compression: 11.5:1 Bore x stroke: 100.0 x 83.0 mm (3.9 x 3.3 inches) Valves per cylinder: 4 Fuel system: Injection. Electronic intake pipe injection/BMW engine management, twin spark ignition Fuel control: DOHC Lubrication system: Dry sump Cooling system: Liquid Gearbox: 5-speed Transmission type, final drive: Chain Clutch: Multiple-disc clutch in oil bath, mechanically operated Driveline: Endless O-ring chain with shock damping in rear wheel hub Fuel consumption: 3.20 litres/100 km (31.3 km/l or 73.51 mpg) Greenhouse gases: 74.2 CO2 g/km. (CO2 - Carbon dioxide emission) Emission details: Closed-loop 3-way catalytic converter, emission standard EU-3 CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Frame type: Bridge-type steel section frame with bolted on rear section Rake (fork angle): 28.1° Trail: 113 mm (4.4 inches) Front suspension: Telescopic fork, 41mm diameter, fork stabiliser Front suspension travel: 170 mm (6.7 inches) Rear suspension: Box-section steel dual swing-arm, central spring strut operated by lever system, spring pre-load hydraulically adjustable (continuously variable) at hand wheel, rebound damping adjustable Rear suspension travel: 140 mm (5.5 inches) Front tyre: 90/90-R21 Rear tyre: 130/80-R17 Front brakes: Single disc. ABS. Can be switched off. Front brakes diameter: 300 mm (11.8 inches) Rear brakes: Single disc. ABS. Can be switched off. Rear brakes diameter: 240 mm (9.4 inches) Wheels: Wire spoke wheels PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Dry weight: 176.9 kg (390.0 pounds) Weight incl. oil, gas, etc: 192.8 kg (425.0 pounds) Power/weight ratio: 0.2826 HP/kg Seat height: 861 mm (33.9 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Overall height: 1,440 mm (56.7 inches) Overall length: 2,184 mm (86.0 inches) Overall width: 919 mm (36.2 inches) Wheelbase: 1,483 mm (58.4 inches) Fuel capacity: 14.00 litres (3.70 gallons) Reserve fuel capacity: 3.79 litres (1.00 gallons) OTHER SPECIFICATIONS Starter: Electric Electrical: 12 V / 12 Ah battery. Color options: Blue/white
  18. 0 reviews

    GENERAL INFORMATION Model: BMW G 650 GS Sertao Year: 2012 Category: Enduro / offroad Rating: 65.5 out of 100 ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Displacement: 652.00 ccm (39.79 cubic inches) Engine type: Single cylinder, four-stroke Power: 48.00 HP (35.0 kW)) @ 6500 RPM Torque: 60.00 Nm (6.1 kgf-m or 44.3 ft.lbs) @ 5000 RPM Top speed: 169.0 km/h (105.0 mph) Compression: 11.5:1 Bore x stroke: 100.0 x 83.0 mm (3.9 x 3.3 inches) Valves per cylinder: 4 Fuel system: Injection. Electronic intake pipe injection/BMW engine management, twin spark ignition Fuel control: DOHC Lubrication system: Dry sump Cooling system: Liquid Gearbox: 5-speed Transmission type, final drive: Chain Clutch: Multiple-disc clutch in oil bath, mechanically operated Driveline: Endless O-ring chain with shock damping in rear wheel hub Fuel consumption: 3.20 litres/100 km (31.3 km/l or 73.51 mpg) Greenhouse gases: 74.2 CO2 g/km. (CO2 - Carbon dioxide emission) Emission details: Closed-loop 3-way catalytic converter, emission standard EU-3 CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Frame type: Bridge-type steel section frame with bolted on rear section Rake (fork angle): 28.1° Trail: 113 mm (4.4 inches) Front suspension: Telescopic fork, 41mm diameter, fork stabiliser Front suspension travel: 170 mm (6.7 inches) Rear suspension: Box-section steel dual swing-arm, central spring strut operated by lever system, spring pre-load hydraulically adjustable (continuously variable) at hand wheel, rebound damping adjustable Rear suspension travel: 140 mm (5.5 inches) Front tyre: 90/90-R21 Rear tyre: 130/80-R17 Front brakes: Single disc. ABS. Can be switched off. Front brakes diameter: 300 mm (11.8 inches) Rear brakes: Single disc. ABS. Can be switched off. Rear brakes diameter: 240 mm (9.4 inches) Wheels: Wire spoke wheels PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Dry weight: 175.0 kg (385.8 pounds) Weight incl. oil, gas, etc: 192.0 kg (423.3 pounds) Power/weight ratio: 0.2743 HP/kg Seat height: 780 mm (30.7 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Overall height: 1,390 mm (54.7 inches) Overall length: 2,165 mm (85.2 inches) Overall width: 920 mm (36.2 inches) Wheelbase: 1,477 mm (58.1 inches) Fuel capacity: 14.00 litres (3.70 gallons) Reserve fuel capacity: 4.00 litres (1.06 gallons) OTHER SPECIFICATIONS Electrical: 12 V/ 12 Ah battery. Color options: Red, white
  19. 0 reviews

    GENERAL INFORMATION Model: BMW G 650 GS Year: 2014 Category: Enduro / offroad Rating: 78.5 out of 100. ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Displacement: 652.00 ccm (39.79 cubic inches) Engine type: Single cylinder, four-stroke Power: 48.00 HP (35.0 kW)) @ 6500 RPM Torque: 60.00 Nm (6.1 kgf-m or 44.3 ft.lbs) @ 5000 RPM Top speed: 170.0 km/h (105.6 mph) Compression: 11.5:1 Bore x stroke: 100.0 x 83.0 mm (3.9 x 3.3 inches) Valves per cylinder: 4 Fuel system: Injection. Electronic intake pipe injection/BMW engine management, twin spark ignition Fuel control: DOHC Lubrication system: Dry sump Cooling system: Liquid Gearbox: 5-speed Transmission type, final drive: Chain Clutch: Multiple-disc clutch in oil bath, mechanically operated Driveline: Endless O-ring chain with shock damping in rear wheel hub Fuel consumption: 3.20 litres/100 km (31.3 km/l or 73.51 mpg) Greenhouse gases: 74.2 CO2 g/km. (CO2 - Carbon dioxide emission) Emission details: Closed-loop 3-way catalytic converter, emission standard EU-3 CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Frame type: Bridge-type steel section frame with bolted on rear section Rake (fork angle): 28.1° Trail: 113 mm (4.4 inches) Front suspension: Telescopic fork, 41mm diameter, fork stabiliser Front suspension travel: 170 mm (6.7 inches) Rear suspension: Box-section steel dual swing-arm, central spring strut operated by lever system, spring pre-load hydraulically adjustable (continuously variable) at hand wheel, rebound damping adjustable Rear suspension travel: 140 mm (5.5 inches) Front tyre: 110/80-R19 Rear tyre: 140/80-R17 Front brakes: Single disc. Optional ABS. Can be switched off. Front brakes diameter: 300 mm (11.8 inches) Rear brakes: Single disc. Optional ABS. Can be switched off. Rear brakes diameter: 240 mm (9.4 inches) Wheels: Cast aluminium PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Dry weight: 175.0 kg (385.8 pounds) Weight incl. oil, gas, etc: 192.0 kg (423.3 pounds) Power/weight ratio: 0.2743 HP/kg Seat height: 780 mm (30.7 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Overall height: 1,390 mm (54.7 inches) Overall length: 2,165 mm (85.2 inches) Overall width: 920 mm (36.2 inches) Wheelbase: 1,477 mm (58.1 inches) Fuel capacity: 14.00 litres (3.70 gallons) Reserve fuel capacity: 4.00 litres (1.06 gallons) OTHER SPECIFICATIONS Starter: Electric Electrical: 12 V/ 12 Ah battery. Color options: Deep black, Aura white
  20. 0 reviews

    GENERAL INFORMATION Model: BMW F 800 GS Year: 2011 Category: Enduro / offroad Rating: 70.5 out of 100. ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Displacement: 798.00 ccm (48.69 cubic inches) Engine type: Twin, four-stroke Power: 84.48 HP (61.7 kW)) @ 7500 RPM Torque: 83.00 Nm (8.5 kgf-m or 61.2 ft.lbs) @ 5750 RPM Compression: 12.0:1 Bore x stroke: 82.0 x 75.6 mm (3.2 x 3.0 inches) Valves per cylinder: 4 Fuel system: Injection. Electronic intake pipe injection / digital engine management (BMS-K) Fuel control: DOHC Lubrication system: Dry sump Cooling system: Liquid Gearbox: 6-speed Transmission type, final drive: Chain Clutch: Multiple-disc clutch in oil bath, mechanically operated Driveline: Endless O-ring chain with shock damping in rear wheel hub Fuel consumption: 3.80 litres/100 km (26.3 km/l or 61.90 mpg) Greenhouse gases: 88.2 CO2 g/km. (CO2 - Carbon dioxide emission) Emission details: Closed-loop 3-way catalytic converter, emission standard EU-3 Exhaust system: Closed-loop 3-way catalytic converter, emission standard EU-3 CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Frame type: Tubular steel space frame, load-bearing engine Rake (fork angle): 26.0° Trail: 117 mm (4.6 inches) Front suspension: Upside-down front fork, Ø 45 mm Front suspension travel: 230 mm (9.1 inches) Rear suspension: Double sided aluminium swing arm, WAD strut (travel related damping), spring pre-load hydraulically adjustable (continuously variable) at handwheel, rebound damping adjustable Rear suspension travel: 215 mm (8.5 inches) Front tyre: 90/90-V21 Rear tyre: 150/70-V17 Front brakes: Double disc Front brakes diameter: 300 mm (11.8 inches) Rear brakes: Single disc Rear brakes diameter: 265 mm (10.4 inches) Wheels: Wire spoke PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Dry weight: 185.0 kg (407.9 pounds) Weight incl. oil, gas, etc: 207.0 kg (456.4 pounds) Power/weight ratio: 0.4566 HP/kg Seat height: 880 mm (34.6 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Overall height: 1,350 mm (53.1 inches) Overall length: 2,320 mm (91.3 inches) Overall width: 945 mm (37.2 inches) Wheelbase: 1,578 mm (62.1 inches) Fuel capacity: 16.00 litres (4.23 gallons) Reserve fuel capacity: 4.00 litres (1.06 gallons) OTHER SPECIFICATIONS Starter: Electric
  21. 0 reviews

    GENERAL INFORMATION Model: BMW F 650 GS Dakar Year: 2004 Category: Enduro / offroad Rating: 76.4 out of 100. ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Displacement: 652.00 ccm (39.79 cubic inches) Engine type: Single cylinder, four-stroke Power: 50.00 HP (36.5 kW)) @ 6500 RPM Torque: 60.00 Nm (6.1 kgf-m or 44.3 ft.lbs) @ 4800 RPM Top speed: 170.0 km/h (105.6 mph) Compression: 11.5:1 Bore x stroke: 100.0 x 83.0 mm (3.9 x 3.3 inches) Valves per cylinder: 4 Fuel system: Injection Fuel control: DOHC Cooling system: Liquid Gearbox: 5-speed Transmission type, final drive: Chain Fuel consumption: 3.20 litres/100 km (31.3 km/l or 73.51 mpg) Greenhouse gases: 74.2 CO2 g/km. (CO2 - Carbon dioxide emission) CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Frame type: Bridge-type steel section frame with bolted-on rear section Rake (fork angle): 29.2° Front suspension: Telescopic fork, stanchion diameter 41 mm, fork stabiliser, 170 mm travel Front suspension travel: 210 mm (8.3 inches) Rear suspension: Box-section steel section dual swing arm, central spring strut action via lever system, spring pre-load hydraulically adjustable to continuously variable levels by means of handwheel, rebound damping adjustable, 165 mm travel Rear suspension travel: 210 mm (8.3 inches) Front tyre: 90/90-21 Rear tyre: 130/80-17 Front brakes: Single disc Front brakes diameter: 300 mm (11.8 inches) Rear brakes: Single disc Rear brakes diameter: 240 mm (9.4 inches) PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Dry weight: 187.0 kg (412.3 pounds) Power/weight ratio: 0.2674 HP/kg Seat height: 870 mm (34.3 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Overall height: 910 mm (35.8 inches) Overall length: 2,189 mm (86.2 inches) Overall width: 1,265 mm (49.8 inches) Wheelbase: 1,479 mm (58.2 inches) Fuel capacity: 17.30 litres (4.57 gallons) Reserve fuel capacity: 4.50 litres (1.19 gallons)
  22. 1 review

    Sporty. Exciting. Uncompromising. For this BMW Motorrad single cylinder bike, asphalt is virtually an insult: 270 mm spring travel, a fully-fledged 53 bhp, a gorgeous frame, richly promising geometry and nothing to get in the way of a ride through the dirt. ENGINE & TRANSMISSION Displacement: 652.00 ccm (39.79 cubic inches) Engine type: Single cylinder, four-stroke Power: 53.00 HP (38.7 kW)) @ 7000 RPM Torque: 60.00 Nm (6.1 kgf-m or 44.3 ft.lbs) @ 5250 RPM Bore x stroke: 100.0 x 83.0 mm (3.9 x 3.3 inches) Fuel system: Injection. Electronic fuel injection Cooling system: Liquid Gearbox: 5-speed Transmission type, final drive: Chain Clutch: Wet, multi-disk Fuel consumption: 5.10 litres/100 km (19.6 km/l or 46.12 mpg) Greenhouse gases: 118.3 CO2 g/km. (CO2 - Carbon dioxide emission) CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Front suspension: 45 mm UPSD fork Rear suspension: Swing arm Front tyre dimensions: 90/90-S21 Rear tyre dimensions: 140/80-S18 Front brakes: Single disc Front brakes diameter: 300 mm (11.8 inches) Rear brakes: Single disc Rear brakes diameter: 240 mm (9.4 inches) PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Dry weight: 144.0 kg (317.5 pounds) Power/weight ratio: 0.3681 HP/kg Seat height: 930 mm (36.6 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Overall length: 2,205 mm (86.8 inches) Wheelbase: 1,500 mm (59.1 inches) Fuel capacity: 9.50 litres (2.51 gallons) OTHER SPEIFICATIONS Starter: Electric Color options: Aura White
  23. 2 reviews

    ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Displacement: 1170.00 ccm (71.39 cubic inches) Engine type: Two cylinder boxer, four-stroke Power: 96.55 HP (70.5 kW)) @ 7000 RPM Torque: 115.00 Nm (11.7 kgf-m or 84.8 ft.lbs) @ 5500 RPM Top speed: 200.0 km/h (124.3 mph) Compression: 11.0:1 Bore x stroke: 101.0 x 73.0 mm (4.0 x 2.9 inches) Valves per cylinder: 4 Fuel system: Injection. Electronic intake pipe injection/digital engine management: BMS-K with overrun fuel cut-off, dual ignition Fuel control: SOHC Cooling system: Oil & air Gearbox: 6-speed Transmission type, final drive: Shaft drive (cardan) Clutch: Single-disc dry clutch, hydraulically operated Fuel consumption: 4.50 litres/100 km (22.2 km/l or 52.27 mpg) Greenhouse gases: 104.4 CO2 g/km. (CO2 - Carbon dioxide emission) CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Frame type: Three-section frame consisting of front and rear section, load bearing engine-gearbox unit Rake (fork angle): 27.1° Trail: 110 mm (4.3 inches) Front suspension: BMW Motorrad Telelever Front suspension travel: 41 mm (1.6 inches) Rear suspension: Die-cast aluminium single-sided swinging arm with BMW Motorrad Paralever Rear suspension travel: 135 mm (5.3 inches) Front tyre: 110/80-ZR19 Rear tyre: 150/70-ZR17 Front brakes: Double disc Front brakes diameter: 305 mm (12.0 inches) Rear brakes: Double disc Rear brakes diameter: 265 mm (10.4 inches) PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Dry weight: 199.0 kg (438.7 pounds) Weight incl. oil, gas, etc: 225.0 kg (496.0 pounds) Power/weight ratio: 0.4852 HP/kg Seat height: 840 mm (33.1 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Overall height: 1,430 mm (56.3 inches) Overall length: 2,210 mm (87.0 inches) Overall width: 915 mm (36.0 inches) Wheelbase: 1,520 mm (59.8 inches) Fuel capacity: 20.00 litres (5.28 gallons) OTHER SPECIFICATIONS Starter: Electric
  24. 3 reviews

    GENERAL INFORMATION Model: BMW F 800 GS Year: 2013 Category: Enduro / offroad Rating: 72.6 out of 100. ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Displacement: 798.00 ccm (48.69 cubic inches) Engine type: Twin, four-stroke Power: 48.00 HP (35.0 kW)) @ 7500 RPM Torque: 83.00 Nm (8.5 kgf-m or 61.2 ft.lbs) @ 5750 RPM Compression: 12.0:1 Bore x stroke: 82.0 x 75.6 mm (3.2 x 3.0 inches) Valves per cylinder: 4 Fuel system: Injection. Electronic intake pipe injection / digital engine management (BMS-K) Fuel control: DOHC Lubrication system: Dry sump Cooling system: Liquid Gearbox: 6-speed Transmission type, final drive: Chain Clutch: Multiple-disc clutch in oil bath, mechanically operated Driveline: Endless O-ring chain with shock damping in rear wheel hub Fuel consumption: 3.80 litres/100 km (26.3 km/l or 61.90 mpg) Greenhouse gases: 88.2 CO2 g/km. (CO2 - Carbon dioxide emission) Emission details: Closed-loop 3-way catalytic converter, emission standard EU-3 CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Frame type: Tubular steel space frame, load-bearing engine Rake (fork angle): 26.0° Trail: 117 mm (4.6 inches) Front suspension: Upside-down front fork, Ø 45 mm Front suspension travel: 230 mm (9.1 inches) Rear suspension: Double sided aluminium swing arm, WAD strut (travel related damping), spring pre-load hydraulically adjustable (continuously variable) at handwheel, rebound damping adjustable Rear suspension travel: 215 mm (8.5 inches) Front tyre: 90/90-V21 Rear tyre: 150/70-V17 Front brakes: Double disc Front brakes diameter: 300 mm (11.8 inches) Rear brakes: Single disc Rear brakes diameter: 265 mm (10.4 inches) Wheels: Wire spoke PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Dry weight: 185.0 kg (407.9 pounds) Weight incl. oil, gas, etc: 207.0 kg (456.4 pounds) Power/weight ratio: 0.4566 HP/kg Seat height: 880 mm (34.6 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Overall height: 1,350 mm (53.1 inches) Overall length: 2,320 mm (91.3 inches) Overall width: 945 mm (37.2 inches) Wheelbase: 1,578 mm (62.1 inches) Fuel capacity: 16.00 litres (4.23 gallons) Reserve fuel capacity: 4.00 litres (1.06 gallons) OTHER SPECIFICATIONS Electrical: 12 V / 14 Ah, maintenance-free battery. Color options: Olive, blue, white
×
×
  • Create New...