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Found 203 results

  1. 0 comments

    this just might be the sweet spot between a 550 pound ADV and a gutless KLR. i have owned both.
  2. KTM has demonstrated its commitment to improving safety for motorcyclists and reducing accidents as the first motorcycle manufacturer to demonstrate Adaptive Cruise Control and Blind Spot Detection systems. Still in the development process, both of these features use sensor-based technology to help detect and prevent a collision from the front or rear. The prototype systems were unveiled on a modified KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S to a select group of media before being live demonstrated at the ÖAMTC driving technique center in Marchtrenk, Austria, on May 2. Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) is not designed as an emergency brake system but works when the machine is in cruise control above a designated speed. The system can detect a vehicle in front, ranging from the size of a motorcycle and above, and then locks on to maintain a distance of two seconds by automatic throttle control and – if needed – gentle application of the front brake. The finalized packaging of the system is still in development along with adding the ability for the rider to customize the operational distance and speed. When fully developed, it is expected that ACC will be able to respond faster than any rider in such a given situation. The ‘blindspot’ on a bike is usually checked by a long, rearward look which can be dangerous in heavy traffic situations. Blind Spot Detection (BSD) adds another set of eyes in such demanding riding conditions or during a particularly long ride. BSD uses a short distance radar to ACC to alert the rider to the potential of an undetected rear collision – such as when changing lanes – by way of a visual warning on the TFT display as well as with illuminating superbright LEDs integrated within the rearview mirror glass, also boosted by audible signal. These game-changing features will be part of new electronics packages offered on certain KTM models, beginning from Model Year 2021. This technology will also create provision for other sensor-based systems further in the future, already in development. After personally demonstrating the effectiveness of these systems to the journalists by riding the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S without his right arm and leg on the machine’s controls, Gerald Matschl, Vice President for KTM Research & Development, said: “As a company, KTM is committed to improving rider safety and also to reduce accidents. We have a lot more development and many thousands of kilometers to test these systems in the real world before we can implement them on series production bikes, but they are coming in the near future and we are sure they will make a difference.” KTM PR Manager (Street), Luke Brackenbury said: “When it comes to KTM applying electronic rider aids to its sportmotorcycles, it has always been the same approach to offer features that help riders control their bikes without losing the joy of riding. Improving safety for motorcyclists is part of our responsibility as a manufacturer and KTM has demonstrated this in the past as the first company to offer two-channel ABS as standard on a 125cc machine with the KTM 125 DUKE in 2014 in the same year as introducing the pioneering cornering-ABS function. With ACC and BSD we hope to make motorcycling safer still.” As a motorcycle technology leader, KTM currently offers a wide range of leading electronic rider aids across most of its 2018 Street range. The goal of such systems is to either help improve rider safety or add to the enjoyment of riding. Lean angle-sensitive systems can be found on the new KTM 790 DUKE and all of the 1290-powered machines, which includes Motorcycle Stability Control (MSC) with the revolutionary cornering ABS function, along with Motor Slip Regulation (MSR) and multi-stage traction control. On some models, semi-active suspension is offered along with Hill Hold Control (HHC), Automatic Turn Indicator Reset (ATIR), Quickshifter+ and cornering LED headlights. Full details of the entire range of technical features on the current KTM Street models can be found in the digital KTM Tech Guide: www.ktm.com/techguide2018
  3. 0 comments

    Man... I wanted this to be a 5* bike, but I can only give it a 4* rating. Suspension is holding it back... I bought this bike to replace my 2008 R1200GSA as a more streetable bike than my 2009 KTM 950 Super Enduro. It is that... for sure. It has WP suspension similar to my 950, but it has nearly 4 inches less travel. There is not much adjustment... I have tweaked it a lot... and just can't get it right. Other than that, this bike is GREAT. Ergos are great. Power is amazing. Neat machine.
  4. I installed these today...
  5. So I have this nice fancy Yoshimira R-77 pipe on my KTM 1190 R and so far I am having no luck putting pannier racks and bags on it. I got the wolfman luggage on black friday to save a few dollars. I never expected finding pannier racks would be so hard. I am on my second set of racks. First one's I tried were Tusk. I returned them with no problem. The cross bar needed to mount right through the exhaust. My second set is now the the Hepco & Becker. They install just fine, but my wolfman bag sits on the exhaust. I am beginning to think i need to sell my exhaust to get bags on this bike. Any suggestions??
  6. 0 comments

    My roots are in road racing so I had to get a supplemental ride. A SuperDuke 990. But since that is not an option for MY GARAGE, I tagged it on with my new 690.
  7. 1 review

    Functions on Adventure models (1190/1290): (See notes below for 1050/1090 models) ABS mode "Offroad": The ABS function is only active on the front wheel (single-channel ABS). The rear wheel can lock at any time without ABS controlling the braking procedure. ABS mode "Off": The ABS function is switched off; it remains deactivated even after switching the ignition back on. The front wheel and rear wheel can lock at any time without the ABS controlling the braking procedure. Function "80 octane" (up to model year 2016): Reduced engine power for trips with lower fuel quality The 'OFFROAD PACK' 60600980000 is additionally required for the 1050/1090 ADVENTURE to be able to use the dongle. Functions on the Super Duke models (1290/1290GT) ABS mode "Supermoto": The ABS function is only active on the front wheel (single-channel ABS). The rear wheel can lock at any time without ABS controlling the braking procedure. ABS mode "Off": The ABS function is switched off; it remains deactivated even after switching the ignition back on. The front and rear wheels can lock at any time without ABS controlling the braking procedure. Functions for 2014+ LC4 models (690): ABS mode 1: The ABS function is only active on the front wheel (single-channel ABS). The rear wheel can lock at any time without ABS controlling the braking procedure. ABS mode 2: The ABS function is switched off; it remains deactivated even after switching the ignition back on. The front and rear wheels can lock at any time without ABS controlling the braking procedure. We carry the proper KTM Dongles for the correct bike in stock. Please choose from the model list below. NOTE: Your dash will now show 'Illegal' upon startup and all that is required upon startup from now on will be hitting the return key. We have no idea why it does this but it's minor compared to resetting everything every time and it kind of inspires us anyway.
  8. 0 comments

    Amazing machine. I've noticed its not as high quality as a BMW but its definitely built for my riding style. KTM has come short on my deal and hasn't activated KTM my ride, hill assist, quick shift, or heated grips. They don't know how to make these options work. It's been a month sense I bought the bike and I haven't got to fully use my bike yet.
  9. 0 comments

    I'm Super Pumped like Ryan Dungey! 😂
  10. 0 comments

    Saying that I am in love with this bike would be an understatement. Out of all the motorcycles I have owned throughout the years, the 1290 SA has been my favorite. Modifications: Rottweiler Stage 3 Intake Kit Blackdog Skid Plate Cyclops LED Headlights Cyclops LED Lightbar Mosko Moto Backcountry Bags Blackdog Oil Cooler Guard Rottweiler Stage 2 SAS and Canister Delete Rottweiler CRG Mirros Rox Risers Sagent Custom Seats SW Motech Rear Master Cylinder Guard
  11. 0 comments

    The baseline for large dirt bikes.
  12. 2 comments

    I've been riding this exquisite bike since 2015. I came to it from a Yamaha Super Tenere XT1200 and a DRZ400S (which I still own as a backup for buddies who want to ride with me, but are "bike-orphaned"). The 690 Enduro is the perfect compromise between the weight benefits of the DRZ and the power of the Tenere. I can't sing the 690's praise enough. It is a blast to cruise down the freeway at a steady 80 mph, or drift through the Santa Monica mountain twisties, or goat-whip it up some gnarly trail at Big Bear or Cleveland national forest. Don't listen to those who say it can't keep up with the heavyweights on long-distance rides. It most certainly can, especially with the right aftermarket seat or - even better - an Airhawk seat pad stretched over the Sweet Cheeks bottle carrier (increases fuel capacity by a couple of liters). The bike's only drawback is that it is not ideal for tight single-tracks which involved sharp, rising switchbacks, due to its relatively ungenerous turning angle. Apart from that, it is a far less stressful bike to take into difficult terrain than the 500 lb adventure machines we love on the freeways. With only 320 lbs to cart around, it is quite nimble. The torque is ridiculously neck-snapping and always induces an insane grin in city riding and on steep, rocky hills. I keep thinking I should get a 240 lb exc, but I'm lazy and useless with tools, so the incredibly low-maintenance schedules keep me on this reliable beast's haunches. The only thing that might get me to trade it in is the forthcoming 790 middleweight from KTM or the T7 under development from Yamaha. I don't ever see myself going back to a 500 lb+ bike... the bulk and limitations of those behemoths just isn't worth tolerating when you can ride a thoroughbred stallion, drop it a dozen times while riding solo and never worry about picking it up, or having it fall on you in a ditch.
  13. I have a very nice 1190adv r for sake with full toyratech accessories. It is on Craigslist, and located in Nashville. If you are interested message me a number or email and I can send a video. $13,500. I’d take partial trades on vintage Bmw, Honda’s, or Harley’s. Also would consider a husky 591 or ktm 500 dual sports with titles. Thanks.
  14. You can FF past the segments that are not ADV bike centric (ADV is around the 20 min. mark) Here's a pic of the 790 reveal:
  15. Hey long time lurker here but I thought I would start a thread about the new KTM 1090 build that I am doing for KTM Twins. For reference this is the last bike that I built: KTM Twins Ultimate 690 Since taking delivery of the bike last month I have made these upgrades: -KTM Touring windscreen -KTM heated grips -KTM GPS mount -KTM Luggage Racks -Double Take Adventure Mirrors -FasstCo Impact foot pegs -Vanasche Motorsports side stand foot -Kriega OS panniers This stuff was basically just the tip of the iceberg to get me through the break in period, this winter she will be going through a full transformation: Suspension, Performance, Ergonomics and general "Adventurizing". I will update this thread as things progress and try to answer any questions/comments along the way.
  16. Harley and dirt bike rider who is new to the ADV world. Bought a 2017 1090 KTM to ride from my home in Montana to Alaska in the early summer of 2018. Excited for the adventure.
  17. t’s been eight long years since the KTM 640 Adventure last appeared on showroom floors. Since 1998, the 640 Adventure was beloved for its light weight, 300+ mile fuel range and long-travel suspension that made it a highly capable long-distance off-road travel machine. There was much to love about the... http://www.advpulse.com/adv-bikes/spy-photos-ktm-690-adventure/
  18. Losing your keys is never a fun experience. Being without transportation is a huge problem if you're a round-the-world adventure rider or even just a commuter or weekend warrior (like me). I actually did lose my key sometime back in November or early December and it's been a real nightmare. My hope is that you can learn from my experience. I'm also hoping KTM will re-examine their process for replacing keys as a result of this. The last time I used my bike was to ride to Marina Del Rey. I went to the gas station to gas up and found my rear tire was flat! I went back to the house and parked the bike in the garage and then put my gear back in the house before going back out to get in the car and drive to Marina Del Rey. Thierry (of OAA) came down in December from Calgary to escape the cold and go riding with me so it was that day, Saturday, December 7th I first realized it was gone. I turned the place upside down looking for that damn key but couldn't find it! I think what most likely happened was I had the motorcycle key in my left pocket and also put my car keys in there. When I pulled my car keys out, I think the motorcycle key probably got tangled up in them and then fell to the ground to be lost forever. I thought this from the start and that gained credibility as the same thing happened with another set of keys I had with my house key and garage key on them that were lost in the parking lot at Costco! So on Monday Dec 9 I called a local KTM dealer and told them I'd lost my key and would have to order another one. I was told $60 but it ended up being $80. I said that I had nothing; no extra keys, no "orange" key or anything. I'd purchased the bike from a guy who bought it at an auction and it only came with the one key and not the original orange key. They put in the order for what ended up taking six weeks to deliver! I got the key (finally) just this past Tuesday (Jan 24) and it did fit in the ignition and did turn the bike on but the bike is now immobilized! Turns out, I need the original orange key that came with the bike to program the bike's immobilizer to accept this new key! I told the dealer this up front and they should have figured out ordering the key wasn't going to get my bike started but they don't order keys that often and didn't know. Might KTM have asked them to verify this up front rather than assume I had the original orange key? Perhaps. So apparently KTM can't just send me another orange key. And apparently the dealer can't just plug my bike into a computer and program this new key to work. They told me that I have to pay another $451 to have another immobilizer with a new orange key and that it would take another three weeks! As you can imagine, my patience with KTM has run out so I'm taking the advice of another rider, Adrian Sanchez of Portland, OR, who used SOS Diagnostics to help him get his Ducati started after losing his key. SOS has a perfect 5.0 star rating with Google Reviews (24 reviews) and 4.9 stars for 8 reviews on Facebook and I'm confident they can get this resolved much quicker and for less money. I'll keep you updated on the results. Lessons learned? What would you do differently after hearing about this lost key business? I know I'll certainly be more careful with my keys in the future but I may also zip tie a spare key to the bike in some deep and hidden recess of the bike in case this happens again. I'd also hope that KTM will take a look at their internal process and make improvements as this seems like one of those "Charley & Ewan moments" where people are going to think twice about which bike they choose to take them around the world if it means being stuck somewhere for six weeks while they wait for a key to be delivered. BMW takes 2-3 days as does my own car maker, Acura. Six weeks seems like kind of a joke, really. I'm told the newer KTM's have different systems and it may not take that long but that's certainly the case for the 990's (right now).
  19. 0 reviews

    SPECIFICATIONS ENGINE Design: 1-cylinder, 4-stroke engine Displacement: 690 cm³ Bore: 102 mm Stroke: 84.5 mm Starter: Electric starter Transmission: 6-speed Primary drive: 36:79 Secondary gear ratio: 15:45 Clutch: APTC(TM) slipper clutch, hydraulically actuated EMS: Keihin EMS with RBW, twin ignition CHASSIS Frame design: Chromium-Molybdenum steel trellis frame, powder coated Front suspension: WP USD Ø 48 mm Rear suspension: WP shock absorber with Pro-Lever linkage Suspension travel (front): 250 mm Suspension travel (rear): 250 mm Front brake: Brembo twin-piston floating calliper, brake disc Rear brake: Brembo single-piston floating calliper, brake disc Front brake disc diameter: 300 mm Rear brake disc diameter: 240 mm Chain: X-Ring 5/8 x 1/4" Steering head angle: 63 ° Wheelbase: 1504 ± 15 mm Ground clearance: 280 mm Seat height: 910 mm Tank capacity (approx.): 12 l
  20. 1 review

    SPECIFICATIONS ENGINE Design: 1-cylinder, 4-stroke engine Displacement: 690 cm³ Bore: 102 mm Stroke: 84.5 mm Starter: Electric starter Transmission: 6-speed Primary drive: 36:79 Secondary gear ratio: 15:45 Clutch: APTC(TM) slipper clutch, hydraulically actuated EMS: Keihin EMS with RBW, twin ignition CHASSIS Frame design: Chromium-Molybdenum steel trellis frame, powder coated Front suspension: WP USD Ø 48 mm Rear suspension: WP shock absorber with Pro-Lever linkage Suspension travel (front): 250 mm Suspension travel (rear): 250 mm Front brake: Brembo twin-piston floating calliper, brake disc Rear brake: Brembo single-piston floating calliper, brake disc Front brake disc diameter: 300 mm Rear brake disc diameter: 240 mm Chain: X-Ring 5/8 x 1/4" Steering head angle: 63 ° Wheelbase: 1504 ± 15 mm Ground clearance: 280 mm Seat height: 910 mm Tank capacity (approx.): 12 l
  21. 0 reviews

    SPECIFICATIONS ENGINE Design: 1-cylinder, 4-stroke engine Displacement: 690 cm³ Bore: 102 mm Stroke: 84.5 mm Starter: Electric starter Transmission: 6-speed Primary drive: 36:79 Secondary gear ratio: 15:45 Clutch: APTC(TM) slipper clutch, hydraulically actuated EMS: Keihin EMS with RBW, twin ignition CHASSIS Frame design: Chromium-Molybdenum steel trellis frame, powder coated Front suspension: WP USD Ø 48 mm Rear suspension: WP shock absorber with Pro-Lever linkage Suspension travel (front): 250 mm Suspension travel (rear): 250 mm Front brake: Brembo twin-piston floating calliper, brake disc Rear brake: Brembo single-piston floating calliper, brake disc Front brake disc diameter: 300 mm Rear brake disc diameter: 240 mm Chain: X-Ring 5/8 x 1/4" Steering head angle: 63 ° Wheelbase: 1504 ± 15 mm Ground clearance: 280 mm Seat height: 910 mm Tank capacity (approx.): 12 l
  22. 0 reviews

    SPECIFICATIONS ENGINE Design: 2-cylinder, 4-stroke, V 75° Displacement: 1301 cm³ Bore: 108 mm Stroke: 71 mm Power in KW: 118 kW Starter: Electric starter Lubrication: Forced oil lubrication with 3 oil pumps Transmission: 6-speed Primary drive: 40:76 Cooling: Liquid cooled Clutch: PASC (TM) slipper clutch, hydraulically actuated EMS: Keihin EMS with RBW and cruise control, double ignition CHASSIS Frame design: Chromium-Molybdenum steel trellis frame, powder coated Front suspension: WP USD Ø 48 mm Rear suspension: WP-PDS Monoshock Suspension travel (front): 220 mm Suspension travel (rear): 220 mm Front brake: 2 x Brembo four-piston radial fixed calliper, brake discs, floating Rear brake: Brembo twin-piston fixed calliper, brake disc Front brake disc diameter: 320 mm Rear brake disc diameter: 267 mm ABS: Bosch 9ME combined ABS (incl. cornering ABS and offroad mode, disengageable) Chain: X-Ring 5/8 x 5/16" Steering head angle: 64 ° Wheelbase: 1580 ± 15 mm Ground clearance: 250 mm Seat height: 890 mm Tank capacity (approx.): 23 l Dry weight: 217 kg
  23. 2 reviews

    SPECIFICATIONS ENGINE Design: 2-cylinder, 4-stroke, V 75° Displacement: 1301 cm³ Bore: 108 mm Stroke: 71 mm Power in KW: 118 kW Starter: Electric starter Lubrication: Forced oil lubrication with 3 oil pumps Transmission: 6-speed Primary drive: 40:76 Cooling: Liquid cooled Clutch: PASC (TM) slipper clutch, hydraulically actuated EMS: Keihin EMS with RBW and cruise control, double ignition CHASSIS Frame design: Chromium-Molybdenum steel trellis frame, powder coated Front suspension: WP USD Ø 48 mm Rear suspension: WP-PDS Monoshock Suspension travel (front): 220 mm Suspension travel (rear): 220 mm Front brake: 2 x Brembo four-piston radial fixed calliper, brake discs, floating Rear brake: Brembo twin-piston fixed calliper, brake disc Front brake disc diameter: 320 mm Rear brake disc diameter: 267 mm ABS: Bosch 9ME combined ABS (incl. cornering ABS and offroad mode, disengageable) Chain: X-Ring 5/8 x 5/16" Steering head angle: 64 ° Wheelbase: 1580 ± 15 mm Ground clearance: 250 mm Seat height: 890 mm Tank capacity (approx.): 23 l Dry weight: 217 kg
  24. 0 reviews

    SPECIFICATIONS ENGINE Design: 2-cylinder, 4-stroke, V 75° Displacement: 1050 cm³ Bore: 103 mm Stroke: 63 mm Power in KW: 92 kW Starter: Electric starter Lubrication: Forced oil lubrication with 3 oil pumps Transmission: 6-speed Primary drive: 40:76 Secondary gear ratio: 17:42 Cooling: Liquid cooled Clutch: PASC (TM) slipper clutch, hydraulically actuated EMS: Keihin EMS with RBW, twin ignition CHASSIS Frame design: Chromium-Molybdenum steel trellis frame, powder coated Front suspension: WP USD Ø 48 mm Rear suspension: WP monoshock Suspension travel (front): 220 mm Suspension travel (rear): 220 mm Front brake: 2 x Brembo four-piston radial fixed calliper, brake discs, floating Rear brake: Brembo twin-piston fixed calliper, brake disc Front brake disc diameter: 320 mm Rear brake disc diameter: 267 mm ABS: Bosch 9M+ two channel (disengageable, offroad mode optional) Chain: X-Ring 5/8 x 5/16" Steering head angle: 64 ° Wheelbase: 1560 ± 15 mm Ground clearance: 250 mm Seat height: 890 mm Tank capacity (approx.): 23 l Dry weight: 207 kg
  25. 1 review

    SPECIFICATIONS ENGINE Design: 2-cylinder, 4-stroke, V 75° Displacement: 1050 cm³ Bore: 103 mm Stroke: 63 mm Power in KW: 92 kW Starter: Electric starter Lubrication: Forced oil lubrication with 3 oil pumps Transmission: 6-speed Primary drive: 40:76 Secondary gear ratio: 17:42 Cooling: Liquid cooled Clutch: PASC (TM) slipper clutch, hydraulically actuated EMS: Keihin EMS with RBW, twin ignition CHASSIS Frame design: Chromium-Molybdenum steel trellis frame, powder coated Front suspension: WP USD Ø 48 mm Rear suspension: WP monoshock Suspension travel (front): 220 mm Suspension travel (rear): 220 mm Front brake: 2 x Brembo four-piston radial fixed calliper, brake discs, floating Rear brake: Brembo twin-piston fixed calliper, brake disc Front brake disc diameter: 320 mm Rear brake disc diameter: 267 mm ABS: Bosch 9M+ two channel (disengageable, offroad mode optional) Chain: X-Ring 5/8 x 5/16" Steering head angle: 64 ° Wheelbase: 1560 ± 15 mm Ground clearance: 250 mm Seat height: 890 mm Tank capacity (approx.): 23 l Dry weight: 207 kg