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Found 27 results

  1. 0 comments

    Best motorcycle I've owned. Only drawback I've found is too many electronic gizmos. Don't get me wrong, the electronics are WONDERFUL but when they fail, you aren't left with many onsite repair options.
  2. Since we've started this project bike, the most frequent question I've been getting is "so how do you like the 990 vs the GSA?" I can tell you it's been a lot of fun! I really like what is obviously better off-road handling and the highway comfort is not as bad as I expected (my Seat Concepts seat sure helps!). While I love my GSA too, I can't say that I'm missing it that much yet. There are a few interesting surprises though that I didn't expect. For example, I thought the 990 was like 100 lbs lighter or something but the specs show the dry weight is just 32 lbs lighter! Also, the 990 has loads more travel, right? Nope. Only with the 990 (R spec suspension from Konflict) has front/rear travel of 248mm/248mm vs the GSA's 210mm/220mm! My stock 990 Adventure came with 210mm/210mm; about the same as the GSA (less in the rear). The center of gravity is also much higher and that, combined with less front end feel (suspension is so good), and you'd best be light on that front brake or you're going to low-side really damn fast! Ask me how I know! The gearing is also taller than the GSA's legendary tractor gearing, but that's easily addressed with larger rear and smaller front sprockets. Bottom line: Much better in the dirt and not as bad on the highway as expected. Pro's: Lots more off-road fun, feels more powerful, nimble, suspension doesn't bottom out (my TFX Suspension on the GSA doesn't either anymore) Con's: Really tall, taller center of gravity, taller gearing, sucks gas big time when you're on the throttle. * I should note here that this switch was due to type of riding I like most. I was looking for something not similar to the GSA but 21/18" wheels, more travel and more dirt-able. The 990 has not fallen short of my expectations, I can assure you.
  3. 0 comments

    2013 BMW R1200 Adventure<br />3 panniers<br />Rox Risers<br />Throttle rocker<br />Mayers Seat<br />Aftermarket Footpegs<br />Garmin 550<br />Sirius Satellite Radio<br />HID Headlight<br />Speedbleeders<br />
  4. 0 comments

    Amazing bike... excellent handling and confort!
  5. Hello all. Names marlin i'm 32 and live in Olympia, wa been riding since i was 20. I was in a terrible motorcycle wreck, took 4 yrs off of riding and missed every day of it. despite everyone i know saying i was stupid i picked up another bike, and i don't plan on stopping. A good friend of mine rainier_runner got me into ADV riding a few years ago. I had a harley vrod and an xr650l, dumped a bunch of money into the xr then sold both for a 2013 r1200gsa. Best move i've ever made.
  6. Employees Ride Their Motorcycles to Work in Show of Support for Charity Ride Woodcliff Lake, NJ – May 15, 2015…Employees of BMW of North America, L.L.C. welcomed Dr. Hans-Henning Buetzow to BMW’s corporate headquarters today and gave him an official send-off for his charity motorcycle ride that will traverse 50,000-miles and raise an anticipated 50,000 euros for children in need throughout the world. Dr. Buetzow will complete his Ride of Smiles journey aboard a BMW R 1200 GS Adventure motorcycle. His route, which will trace a symbolic 50 on the world map, will take him across North, Central and South America as well as Australia and New Zealand. His goal is to raise at least 50,000 euros for four charitable organizations: Doctors Without Borders, Christian Blind Mission, United for Africa, and Sternstunden, the Bavarian TV and Radio Broadcast. “We are delighted to welcome Dr. Buetzow to BMW today to give him a proper send-off on his long and ambitious journey,” commented Kris Odwarka, Vice President, BMW Motorrad USA. “I am confident that the bike is up to the task; and I’m sure Hans is too, judging from his previous adventures!” Mr. Odwarka thanked BMW employees who rode their motorcycles to work in a show of support for Dr. Buetzow. “Imagine your commute times 1,000, and you can understand what Hans-Henning is about to do. We wish him a safe and prosperous journey.” A resident of Heidelberg, Dr. Buetzow is an experienced and enthusiastic motorcycle tourist, who has been traveling the world on two wheels since 1989. Impressed by the enormous hospitality and joy of life shown by the people he meets on his travels, he was inspired to give back to those less fortunate through his Ride of Smiles. Donations can be made directly to the four charities or via the Ride of Smiles website (www.ride-of-smiles.de). For more information on Ride of
  7. 0 reviews

    GENERAL INFORMATION Model: BMW R 1200 GS Adventure Year: 2014 Category: Enduro / offroad ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Displacement: 1170.00 ccm (71.39 cubic inches) Engine type: Two cylinder boxer, four-stroke Power: 125.00 HP (91.2 kW)) @ 7750 RPM Torque: 125.00 Nm (12.7 kgf-m or 92.2 ft.lbs) @ 6500 RPM Compression: 12.5:1 Bore x stroke: 101.0 x 73.0 mm (4.0 x 2.9 inches) Valves per cylinder: 4 Fuel system: Injection. Electronic intake pipe injection Fuel control: DOHC Cooling system: Oil & air Gearbox: 6-speed Transmission type, final drive: Shaft drive (cardan) Clutch: Oil lubricated clutch, hydraulically operated Driveline: Constant mesh Fuel consumption: 4.30 litres/100 km (23.3 km/l or 54.70 mpg) Greenhouse gases: 99.8 CO2 g/km. (CO2 - Carbon dioxide emission) Emission details: Closed-loop 3-way catalytic converter, emission standard EU-3 CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Frame type: Two-section frame consisting of front and rear sections, load- bearing engine-gearbox unit Rake (fork angle): 24.5° Trail: 93 mm (3.6 inches) Front suspension: BMW Motorrad Telelever; stanchion diameter 37 mm, central spring strut Front suspension travel: 210 mm (8.3 inches) Rear suspension: Cast aluminium single-sided swing arm with BMW Motorrad Paralever; WAD strut (travel-related damping), spring pre-load hydraulically adjustable (continuously variable) at handwheel, rebound damping adjustable at handwheel Rear suspension travel: 220 mm (8.7 inches) Front tyre: 120/70-R19 Rear tyre: 170/60-R17 Front brakes: Double disc. ABS. Floating discs. Four-piston calipers. Front brakes diameter: 305 mm (12.0 inches) Rear brakes: Single disc. ABS. Floating disc. Two-piston calipers. Rear brakes diameter: 275 mm (10.8 inches) Wheels: Cross-spoke wheels PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Dry weight: 229.1 kg (505.0 pounds) Weight incl. oil, gas, etc: 260.0 kg (573.2 pounds) Power/weight ratio: 0.5457 HP/kg Seat height: 890 mm (35.0 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Overall height: 1,450 mm (57.1 inches) Overall length: 2,255 mm (88.8 inches) Overall width: 980 mm (38.6 inches) Wheelbase: 1,510 mm (59.4 inches) Fuel capacity: 30.00 litres (7.93 gallons) Reserve fuel capacity: 4.00 litres (1.06 gallons) OTHER SPECIFICATIONS Starter: Electric Electrical: 12 V / 11.8 Ah, maintenance-free battery.
  8. 0 reviews

    GENERAL INFORMATION Model: BMW R 1200 GS Adventure Year: 2012 Category: Enduro / offroad Rating: 59.1 out of 100. ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Displacement: 1170.00 ccm (71.39 cubic inches) Engine type: Two cylinder boxer, two-stroke Engine details: Rradially aligned valves Power: 48.00 HP (35.0 kW)) @ 7750 RPM Torque: 120.00 Nm (12.2 kgf-m or 88.5 ft.lbs) @ 6000 RPM Compression: 12.0:1 Bore x stroke: 101.0 x 73.0 mm (4.0 x 2.9 inches) Fuel system: Injection. Electronic intake pipe injection/BMS-K digital engine management with overrun fuel cut-off, twin spark ignition Fuel control: DOHC Lubrication system: Dry sump Cooling system: Oil & air Gearbox: 6-speed Transmission type, final drive: Shaft drive (cardan) Clutch: Single dry plate clutch, hydraulically operated Fuel consumption: 4.60 litres/100 km (21.7 km/l or 51.13 mpg) Greenhouse gases: 106.7 CO2 g/km. (CO2 - Carbon dioxide emission) Emission details: Closed-loop 3-way catalytic converter CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Frame type: Two-section frame consisting of front and rear sections, load- bearing engine-gearbox unit Rake (fork angle): 24.8° Trail: 89 mm (3.5 inches) Front suspension: BMW Motorrad Telelever Front suspension travel: 210 mm (8.3 inches) Rear suspension: Cast aluminium single-sided swing arm with BMW Motorrad Paralever Rear suspension travel: 220 mm (8.7 inches) Front tyre: 110/80-R19 Rear tyre: 150/70-R17 Front brakes: Double disc. Optional integral ABS. Can be switched off. Front brakes diameter: 305 mm (12.0 inches) Rear brakes: Single disc. Optional integral ABS. Can be switched off. Rear brakes diameter: 265 mm (10.4 inches) Wheels: Cross-spoke wheels PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Dry weight: 223.0 kg (491.6 pounds) Weight incl. oil, gas, etc: 256.0 kg (564.4 pounds) Power/weight ratio: 0.2152 HP/kg Seat height: 890 mm (35.0 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Alternate seat height: 765 mm (30.1 inches) If adjustable, highest setting. Overall height: 1,525 mm (60.0 inches) Overall length: 2,240 mm (88.2 inches) Wheelbase: 1,510 mm (59.4 inches) Fuel capacity: 33.00 litres (8.72 gallons) Reserve fuel capacity: 4.00 litres (1.06 gallons) OTHER SPECIFICATIONS Starter: Electric Electrical: 12 V / 14 Ah, maintenance-free battery. Seat: Two section dual seat with variable height rider´s seat Color options: Magma red
  9. 0 reviews

    GENERAL INFORMATION Model: BMW R 1200 GS Adventure Year: 2010 Category: Enduro / offroad Rating: 75.4 out of 100. ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Displacement: 1170.00 ccm (71.39 cubic inches) Engine type: Two cylinder boxer, two-stroke Power: 103.25 HP (75.4 kW)) @ 7500 RPM Torque: 115.00 Nm (11.7 kgf-m or 84.8 ft.lbs) @ 5750 RPM Compression: 12.0:1 Bore x stroke: 101.0 x 73.0 mm (4.0 x 2.9 inches) Valves per cylinder: 4 Fuel system: Injection. Electronic intake pipe injection/BMS-K digital engine management with overrun fuel cut-off, twin spark ignition Fuel control: SOHC Cooling system: Oil & air Gearbox: 6-speed Transmission type, final drive: Shaft drive (cardan) Clutch: Single dry plate clutch, hydraulically operated Fuel consumption: 4.60 litres/100 km (21.7 km/l or 51.13 mpg) Greenhouse gases: 106.7 CO2 g/km. (CO2 - Carbon dioxide emission) Exhaust system: Closed-loop 3-way catalytic converter, emission standard EU-3 CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Frame type: Two-section frame consisting of front and rear sections, load- bearing engine-gearbox unit Rake (fork angle): 24.8° Trail: 89 mm (3.5 inches) Front suspension: BMW Motorrad Telelever Front suspension travel: 210 mm (8.3 inches) Rear suspension: Cast aluminium single-sided swing arm with BMW Motorrad Paralever Rear suspension travel: 220 mm (8.7 inches) Front tyre: 110/80-R19 Rear tyre: 150/70-R17 Front brakes: Double disc Front brakes diameter: 305 mm (12.0 inches) Rear brakes: Single disc Rear brakes diameter: 265 mm (10.4 inches) PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Dry weight: 223.0 kg (491.6 pounds) Weight incl. oil, gas, etc: 256.0 kg (564.4 pounds) Power/weight ratio: 0.4630 HP/kg Seat height: 910 mm (35.8 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Overall height: 1,525 mm (60.0 inches) Overall length: 2,240 mm (88.2 inches) Overall width: 990 mm (39.0 inches) Wheelbase: 1,510 mm (59.4 inches) Fuel capacity: 33.00 litres (8.72 gallons) Reserve fuel capacity: 4.00 litres (1.06 gallons) OTHER SPECIFICATIONS Starter: Electric Color options: Yellow, gray
  10. 0 reviews

    GENERAL INFORMATION Model: BMW R 1200 GS Adventure Year: 2009 Category: Enduro / offroad Rating: 73 out of 100. ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Displacement: 1170.00 ccm (71.39 cubic inches) Engine type: Two cylinder boxer, two-stroke Power: 103.25 HP (75.4 kW)) @ 7500 RPM Torque: 115.00 Nm (11.7 kgf-m or 84.8 ft.lbs) @ 5750 RPM Compression: 12.0:1 Bore x stroke: 101.0 x 73.0 mm (4.0 x 2.9 inches) Valves per cylinder: 4 Fuel system: Injection. Electronic intake pipe injection/BMS-K digital engine management with overrun fuel cut-off, twin spark ignition Fuel control: SOHC Cooling system: Oil & air Gearbox: 6-speed Transmission type, final drive: Shaft drive (cardan) Clutch: Single dry plate clutch, hydraulically operated Fuel consumption: 4.60 litres/100 km (21.7 km/l or 51.13 mpg) Greenhouse gases: 106.7 CO2 g/km. (CO2 - Carbon dioxide emission) Exhaust system: Closed-loop 3-way catalytic converter, emission standard EU-3 CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Frame type: Two-section frame consisting of front and rear sections, load- bearing engine-gearbox unit Rake (fork angle): 24.8° Trail: 89 mm (3.5 inches) Front suspension: BMW Motorrad Telelever Front suspension travel: 210 mm (8.3 inches) Rear suspension: Cast aluminium single-sided swing arm with BMW Motorrad Paralever Rear suspension travel: 220 mm (8.7 inches) Front tyre: 110/80-R19 Rear tyre: 150/70-R17 Front brakes: Double disc Front brakes diameter: 305 mm (12.0 inches) Rear brakes: Single disc Rear brakes diameter: 265 mm (10.4 inches) PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Dry weight: 223.0 kg (491.6 pounds) Weight incl. oil, gas, etc: 256.0 kg (564.4 pounds) Power/weight ratio: 0.4630 HP/kg Seat height: 910 mm (35.8 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Overall height: 1,525 mm (60.0 inches) Overall length: 2,240 mm (88.2 inches) Overall width: 990 mm (39.0 inches) Wheelbase: 1,510 mm (59.4 inches) Fuel capacity: 33.00 litres (8.72 gallons) Reserve fuel capacity: 4.00 litres (1.06 gallons) OTHER SPECIFICATIONS Starter: Electric
  11. 0 reviews

    GENERAL INFORMATION Model: BMW R 1200 GS Adventure Year: 2007 Category: Enduro / offroad Rating: 62.2 out of 100. ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Displacement: 1170.00 ccm (71.39 cubic inches) Engine type: Twin, four-stroke Power: 99.23 HP (72.4 kW)) @ 7000 RPM Torque: 115.00 Nm (11.7 kgf-m or 84.8 ft.lbs) @ 5500 RPM Compression: 11.0:1 Bore x stroke: 101.0 x 73.0 mm (4.0 x 2.9 inches) Valves per cylinder: 4 Fuel system: Injection Fuel control: SOHC Cooling system: Oil & air Gearbox: 6-speed Transmission type, final drive: Shaft drive (cardan) Clutch: Single-disc dry clutch, hydraulically operated Fuel consumption: 4.60 litres/100 km (21.7 km/l or 51.13 mpg) Greenhouse gases: 106.7 CO2 g/km. (CO2 - Carbon dioxide emission) CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Frame type: Three-section frame consisting of front and rear section, load bearing engine-gearbox unit Rake (fork angle): 26.2° Trail: 98 mm (3.8 inches) Front suspension: BMW Motorrad Telelever Front suspension travel: 210 mm (8.3 inches) Rear suspension: Die-cast aluminium single-sided swinging arm with BMW Motorrad Paralever Rear suspension travel: 220 mm (8.7 inches) Front tyre: 110/80-R19 Rear tyre: 150/70-R17 Front brakes: Double disc Front brakes diameter: 305 mm (12.0 inches) Rear brakes: Double disc Rear brakes diameter: 265 mm (10.4 inches) PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Dry weight: 223.0 kg (491.6 pounds) Weight incl. oil, gas, etc: 256.0 kg (564.4 pounds) Power/weight ratio: 0.4450 HP/kg Seat height: 910 mm (35.8 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Overall height: 1,470 mm (57.9 inches) Overall length: 2,250 mm (88.6 inches) Overall width: 955 mm (37.6 inches) Wheelbase: 1,511 mm (59.5 inches) Fuel capacity: 33.00 litres (8.72 gallons) OTHER SPECIFICATIONS Starter: Electric
  12. 0 reviews

    GENERAL INFORMATION Model: BMW R 1200 GS Adventure Year: 2006 Category: Enduro / offroad Rating: 67.2 out of 100. ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Displacement: 1170.00 ccm (71.39 cubic inches) Engine type: Twin, four-stroke Power: 99.23 HP (72.4 kW)) @ 7000 RPM Torque: 115.00 Nm (11.7 kgf-m or 84.8 ft.lbs) @ 5500 RPM Compression: 11.0:1 Bore x stroke: 101.0 x 73.0 mm (4.0 x 2.9 inches) Valves per cylinder: 4 Fuel system: Injection Fuel control: SOHC Cooling system: Oil & air Gearbox: 6-speed Transmission type, final drive: Shaft drive (cardan) Clutch: Single-disc dry clutch, hydraulically operated Fuel consumption: 4.60 litres/100 km (21.7 km/l or 51.13 mpg) Greenhouse gases: 106.7 CO2 g/km. (CO2 - Carbon dioxide emission) CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Frame type: Three-section frame consisting of front and rear section, load bearing engine-gearbox unit Rake (fork angle): 26.2° Trail: 98 mm (3.8 inches) Front suspension: BMW Motorrad Telelever Front suspension travel: 210 mm (8.3 inches) Rear suspension: Die-cast aluminium single-sided swinging arm with BMW Motorrad Paralever Rear suspension travel: 220 mm (8.7 inches) Front tyre: 110/80-R19 Rear tyre: 150/70-R17 Front brakes: Double disc Front brakes diameter: 305 mm (12.0 inches) Rear brakes: Double disc Rear brakes diameter: 265 mm (10.4 inches) PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Dry weight: 223.0 kg (491.6 pounds) Weight incl. oil, gas, etc: 256.0 kg (564.4 pounds) Power/weight ratio: 0.4450 HP/kg Seat height: 910 mm (35.8 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Overall height: 1,470 mm (57.9 inches) Overall length: 2,250 mm (88.6 inches) Overall width: 955 mm (37.6 inches) Wheelbase: 1,511 mm (59.5 inches) Fuel capacity: 33.00 litres (8.72 gallons) OTHER SPECIFICATIONS Starter: Electric
  13. WASHINGTON, D.C. – March 27, 2015 – (Motor Sports Newswire) – RECALL Subject: Rear Wheel Mounting Flange may Crack Report Receipt Date: MAR 11, 2015 NHTSA Campaign Number: 15V141000 Component(s): WHEELS Potential Number of Units Affected: 43,426 All Products Associated with this Recall Vehicle Make HP2 ENDURO 2006 HP2 MEGAMOTO 2008-2009 HP2 SPORT 2008-2010 K 1200 GT 2006-2008 K 1200 R 2006-2008 K 1200 R SPORT 2007 K 1200 S 2005-2008 K 1300 GT 2009-2010 K 1300 R 2010-2011 K 1300 S 2009-2011 R 1200 GS 2005-2010 R 1200 GS ADVENTURE 2006-2010 R 1200 R 2007-2010 R 1200 RT 2005-2010 R 1200 S 2007 R 1200 ST 2005-2007 Manufacturer: BMW of North America, LLC SUMMARY: BMW of North America, LLC (BMW) is recalling certain model year 2005-2010 R1200GS and R1200RT, 2006-2010 R1200GS Adventure, 2007-2010 R1200R, 2007 R1200S and K1200R Sport, 2005-2007 R1200ST, 2008-2009 HP2 Megamoto, 2006 HP2 Enduro, 2008-2010 HP2 Sport, 2005-2008 K1200S, 2006-2008 K1200R, K1200GT, 2009-2011 K1300S, 2010-2011 K1300R, and 2009-2010 K1300GT motorcycles. In the affected motorcycles, the rear wheel mounting flange may crack if the rear wheel mounting bolts are overtightened. CONSEQUENCE: If the rear wheel mounting flange cracks, the mounting bolts may loosen and the rear wheel may not remain secured to the motorcycle, causing a loss of stability and increasing the risk of a crash. REMEDY: BMW will notify owners, and dealers will replace the existing aluminum rear wheel flange with a steel one, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin April 21, 2015. Owners may contact BMW customer service at 1-800-525-7417. NOTES: Owners may also contact the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Vehicle Safety Hotline at 1-888-327-4236 (TTY 1-800-424-9153), or go to www.safercar.gov.
  14. 0 comments

    The greatest Bike I've owned to date, Opened a world of back road fun !!
  15. This should apply to the GS as well and to all the oilhead models. No pics (yet) but I am happy to report no bloody knuckles. I got one minor scratch on my right middle finger. For anyone looking to change their front shock (rear is pretty easy), here's how to do it... First you want to remove your lower engine guards. This can be a challenge for some because the top fasteners tend to be hard to get to and loosen without stripping. Then you wan to remove the alternator belt cover. Why? Because it gets in the way of pulling out the shock and putting the new one in later. Next you want to remove a screw holding the front brake line on the right side of the bike. If you don't do this then you won't have slack to droop the front suspension low enough to get the shock out. It's tight in there and I found an L-shaped torx from my tool kit was the best solution. You have to somehow jack the bike up from the skid plate but with the rear still on the ground. I was able to lift it (with a friend) on top of my pannier, but a floor jack is probably ideal and safer. I also secured the bike with a strap from the middle of the handlebars to a hook firmly screwed into a beam in the roof of my garage. Then remove the top tank panel, as well as the two side panels and gas cap (four black screws). I put a rag in the tank opening so those screws holding the gas cap on don't accidentally fall in. Leave the front screws on the side plastic pieces secure; just take off the other two. These are just metal panels; it's really not that hard. Remember the longer screws go in that middle hole of the side plastic pieces. The rest should be roughly the same length. At this point you should be able to put a socket on the top bolt of the shock and take that top nut off. If you have a nifty ratcheting box-end wrench then you may be able to get away with not removing the top tank panel. It might be 15mm or 17 mm or in my case 11/16ths". Not a lot of room to work with. Keep the top bushing/spacer and remember to put it back on top of the new shock later. Remove the lower shock bolt from the right side. At this point, the shock should fall out of the top bracket and come loose from the lower mount. If it doesn't come loose from the lower mount, you can knock it back with a rubber mallet or something until it comes free. Also be sure to keep the rubber bushings and/or spacer that goes on top of the shock but below the top bracket. Then simply put the new shock in but make sure you put the top rubber washer below the bracket back on the new shock. Put the top end in first, then you can slide it forward and down into the lower shock mount. Tighten down the lower shock bolt to 30 ft/lbs/40 Nm and some blue loctite. At this point you can lower your bike back to the floor and on its center stand. Make sure the top of the shock is properly seated through the hole in the bracket. Place that other rubber washer you removed from your other shock on top and then secure with the top nut. I put a bit of blue loctite on it. Tighten down to 25 ft/lbs/34 Nm. Ah, but the shock turns when you try to tighten it! At first I tried a strap wrench but it wasn't really gripping. I finally found the crescent wrench from my tool bag (or 19mm open end wrench) would fit on the very top nut below the top bracket and prevent the shock from turning when you're tightening it. Yes, you will need the assistance of a buddy (two man job). Then you can put the alternator cover back on (not a bad time to consider changing your belt if it's been on there for more than 24K miles), as well as re-secure the front brake line on the right side. Then put your lower engine bars back on. That also can be a challenge and take two sets of hands and maybe some straps to pull the upper bars into alignment so you can attach them to the lower bars.
  16. 2 reviews

    SPECIFICATIONS Year: 2013 Manufacturer: BMW Model: R1200GS Adventure Engine Type: Flat twin 'Boxer' 4-stroke engine, two camshafts, four radially aligned valves Engine Displacement: 1170cc Bore & Stroke: 101 mm x 73 mm Compression Ratio: 12.0:1 Cooling: Air/Liquid Cooled Fuel System: Digital engine management with overrun fuel cut-off, twin spark ignition Ignition: Electronic Starting System: Electric Transmission: Constant mesh 6-speed gearbox with helical gear teeth Final Drive: Shaft Rake and Trail: N/A Wheel Base: 59.4 in. Seat Height: 35.0/35.8 inches (890/910 mm) Front Suspension: Central spring strut, spring pre-load with 5-position mechanical adjustment Rear Suspension: Spring pre-load hydraulically adjustable (continuously variable) at handwheel Front Brake: Dual disc brake, floating brake discs, diameter 305 mm, 4-piston fixed calipers Rear Brake: Single disc brake, diameter 265 mm, double-piston floating caliper Front Tire: 110/80R-19 Rear Tire: 150/70R-17 Fuel Capacity: 8.7 gal. with approximately 1.0 gal. in reserve Dry Weight: 564 lbs. (Wet)
  17. 0 comments

    It's name is "El Burro." Less than two years old and It has gotten me everywhere! The '13 the last year of the Oil/Air cooled 1200 boxer Adv Models.
  18. 0 comments

    I have done almost everything with that bike. Long distance Trip? Done. Short weekend trip? Done. OffRoad? Done. Extreme Offroad? Done. RaceTrack? Done. City run? Done. And it shines on all and every aspect of motorcycling. Low fuel consumption (given it's weight and power), awesome torque, handling on pavement is just awesome, offroad handling is not that great, but once you get used to the telelever shit... it will bring you anywhere no matter what. So far, If I had to buy another motorcycle today.... i would buy exactly the same bike. :)
  19. 0 comments

    Bought used in 2010 and haven't regretted it for a minute. Took it on White Rim Trail (not sure what I was thinking) as my first off road experience since being a kid. This is my go-to, long mileage bike. Aftermarket Corbin allows me to easily do 700-900 mile days.
  20. 0 comments

    Superb long distance traveling GS. This 2014 R1200GS Adventure is thus far the most competent do it all motorcycle that I've owned. I have the opportunity to ride all models of BMW motorcycles on regular basis, and if I had to own one from the entire line up it would be this bike. 300+ mile fuel range, great rider protection, comfortable riding position and features such as cruse control, and adjustable windscreen while on the way are just a few of the redeeming qualities. It's a pleasure to ride no matter how far both paved and dirt. However, your perspective of this motorcycle will grow as your ride takes you further and further away home.
  21. How to remove the rear shock, replace a clutch slave and fill/bleed a clutch line on a (2011) BMW GS Adventure One of the cool things you may have found over the years of motorcycle ownership is first that you’re probably a decent judge after all of what’s really wrong with your bike and that you’re quite capable of fixing a lot of things by yourself. At least that’s what I learned in this case. It all started after completing the COBDR in July ’13. After this gnarly water crossing where I was going too fast through some too-deep water and the engine sucked in some water requiring a trail side air filter, oil filter and oil change, I started to also have an issue with my clutch. It was primarily on the way home. I was riding through some pretty hot weather from Steamboat Springs headed back to Irvine and it was probably Grand Junction when I first noticed the problem. I was coming off the freeway ramp and downshifting when I noticed there was almost no play in the clutch lever. The bike stalled because I couldn’t get it into neutral or use the clutch lever to disengage the gearing. I managed to park it at a Wendy’s, had lunch and then when I came back out and started it up again, the clutch was fine! It was something about the warmer temps or when the engine was hot it would act up. After I got home, I took it into the dealer to check it out and they said it was “just a bubble in the clutch line.” They flushed and filled and it was working fine. Well, it did work fine until the weather warmed up and it started to do the same thing. I then took it to an independent mechanic (since I was now out of warranty) and he said it wasn’t clear to him what was wrong. He did mention the push rod looked a bit worn and replaced that, but it’s only like a $9 part. He did run the engine quite a long time in order to try and recreate the problem but it wasn’t happening. Sure enough, when it warmed up again (WMRS ride in Aug ’13) the clutch went out again. At this point I had learned quite a bit about what types of clutch problems tend to crop up and my #1 theory was that the clutch slave was bad and needed to be replaced. I ordered a new clutch slave for about $155 (plus some new crush washers) and bought some special BMW clutch fluid ($26), although you can find a brand by Magura (Royal Blood Brake Fluid) at your local bicycle shop is essentially the same thing (Magura is the mfg of the clutch slave). The replacement process was really a breeze! So why did the slave fail in the first place? Was it defective? Was it normal wear and tear? Poorly designed? I think the most likely culprit is thermal shock, where the hot engine encounters cold water at a water crossing and that somehow compromised the slave. There is no gasket where it attaches, so I’m thinking that’s the most likely reason. We all like to blame the mechanics too, but I think the nature of this problem (only acts up when hot) makes it hard to diagnose. I will lay out the basics here, but the more detailed instructions are in the attached video. I figure not many of you will need to replace a clutch slave, but many more will need to take the rear shock off and perhaps bleed your own brake lines (every two years), so this should be helpful. Remove rear wheel Remove exhaust muffler Remove the top bolt of your rear shock under the seat. Using a strap to raise the swing arm high enough, remove the lower shock bolt and remove shock. You may notice you can’t get in there with a torque bit unless you raise the swing harm high enough. Two screws will remove the clutch slave; clean out back of engine w/brake fluid and install new clutch slave. Before you re-attach the clutch line to the master cylinder up top and the new slave below, flush it out with brake cleaner, then air to dry. Reattach clutch line using new crush washers top (near master cylinder) and bottom (at slave). Refill the master cylinder reservoir and attach ¼” OD vinyl hose to the bleed valve at the bottom. Using the process described in the video, pump the new fluid through until you see no bubbles. Tighten it back up, re-install rear shock (red loctite and proper torque specs) and exhaust and you’re ready to go!
  22. 0 comments

    Most versatile bike I have ever owned... bar none.
  23. 4 reviews

    IDENTIFICATION Model Type: On-Off Road Dealers: BMW Dealers Warranty: 36 ENGINE Engine Type: Flat Twin Cylinders: 2 Engine Stroke: 4-Stroke Cooling: Air / Oil Valves: 8 Valves Per Cylinder: 4 Valve Configuration: OHV Compression Ratio: 12.0:1 Starter: Electric Fuel Requirements: Premium Fuel Type: Gas TRANSMISSION Transmission Type: Manual Number Of Speeds: 6 Primary Drive (Rear Wheel): Shaft WHEELS & TIRES Front Tire (Full Spec): 110/80 HR19 Rear Tire (Full Spec): 150/70 HR17 BRAKES Front Brake Type: Dual Hydraulic Disc Rear Brake Type: Hydraulic Disc TECHNIAL SPECIFICATIONS Wheelbase (in/mm): 59.4 / 1508.8 Fuel Capacity (gal/l): 8.7 / 33
  24. 0 comments

    Certainly the most reliable motorcycle I have ever owned. I have been to the Yukon, Baja, and everywhere in between without any issues. It has been my only mode of transportation for the past three years as until recently I didn't own a car.