What folding mirrors do you like?

BikeAccessories

The stock mirrors on my Tiger 800XC are great, but they don't fold on the trail and this is pretty much the #1 point of contact when riding bushy trails. So, I'd like to upgrade to some folding units. What is out there that is durable, easy to fold/unfold, and are solid enough to not vibrate on the highway, making them pretty much useless.

 

 

The touratech units look nice:

01-040-0771-0_i_03.jpg

Any other brands that should be on my list of consideration?

DoubleTake is my favorite and made by amateur Dakar racer Ned Suesse.

 

MAS_DTM_Faded_GS.jpg

Ram ball/sockets do hold incredibly well. Anyone else?

These have worked well for me on the project 990 from Rottweiler Performance

 

Reviewed here

 

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How about these KTM oem Enduro mirrors

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I've been running a set of hand guards with mirrors from Highway Dirt Bike. For longer road trips I throw the stocks back on. 

HDB set-up is pretty sweet along with their custom handlebar clamp.Looks to be the ultimate combo. 

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