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Eric Hall

What companies should ADV riders avoid doing business with?

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Removing Bridgestone/Firestone tires.  I spoke with them at AIMExpo and they cleared it up.  It was some story about some land in TN they set aside then prohibited any kind of motorsport recreation on.  Turns out they did donate the land but then the agency (State of TN?) imposed those restrictions, not Bridgestone/Firestone.  They used to to tire testing on the land and they're not allowed to do that anymore either!  Beware who you give your land away to I guess is the lesson!

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This is all fake news. I have yet to find any sources they are quoting... "22% of all pollution comes from thrill craft"??? Seriously?? And they say nothing about the equestrian culture, which have the highest impact of any one group, on trails and the management of trails. As per the Forest Service.

Edited by Ride200mi
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Since I first did this post I've had a LOT of pushback; most of which has been knee-jerk politically motivated stuff.  But once or twice a few riders have made some excellent points about not just choosing who you buy your kit from but actually DOING something more constructive which is getting involved in the greater community.  Get to know your local groups, BLM, etc... so you have not just a voice in what's done with the trails you like to ride but an active participant in keeping things working well and going smoothly.

 

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After watching the recent XLADV story in IG about this topic, other postings in IG have me wondering--maybe concerned really. Other IG postings (video) of some pretty awesome riding show riders traversing down a small stream or undisturbed, green ground cover having new tracks and ruts cut into it. None of these posters are stating they are on private or public lands and without that, it has me wondering how much this works well for groups such as the Sierra Club. Think about it. If these videos are not helping the fight to protect what riding areas are now available, maybe they are hurting. Not all social media content can be put into this harmful-to-the-sport arena. 

Everyone helps where/when they can. First, and not a new message, is to ride responsibly. Then, join a club or organization and support with time, money, or both. The Sierra Club has 3.5 million members. The American Motorcyclist Association has less than 250k at any given point in the current year! (I'll hit my 21st year of membership this year). Though I do not live in California and have only ridden some off-highway lands twice since 2015, I recently donated some funds to C.O.R.V.A. 

Really though, I am suspecting that there is no shortage of off-road motorcycles being clearly ridden off of trails or roads that are used against us by members of groups such as the Sierra Club.

Just a thought and comment...

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There most certainly and unfortunately are too many people riding off trail and setting a bad example.  We all have to stand up to point this out and set a better example.  There's always going to be a few bad apples.  I think the CORVA's and BRC's etc... play a good role here in education.

I have a buddy who posted a video of them riding out in the desert and at one point the leader realized he was going the wrong way so he just cut right across the desert to get back on a road he wanted to go on.  I pointed out that he may not only want to refrain from riding like that but take the video down.  He was like "what's the big deal?"  Not everyone gets it unfortunately.

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