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Found 17 results

  1. Chris.GVS

    Triumph Tiger 800 XC 2015

    0 reviews

    GENERAL INFORMATION Model: Triumph Tiger 800 XC Year: 2015 Category: Allround Rating: 79.6 out of 100. ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Displacement: 799.00 ccm (48.75 cubic inches) Engine type: In-line three, four-stroke Power: 95.00 HP (69.3 kW)) @ 9300 RPM Torque: 79.00 Nm (8.1 kgf-m or 58.3 ft.lbs) @ 7850 RPM Bore x stroke: 74.0 x 61.9 mm (2.9 x 2.4 inches) Valves per cylinder: 4 Fuel system: Injection. Multipoint sequential electronic fuel injection Fuel control: DOHC Cooling system: Liquid Gearbox: 6-speed Transmission type, final drive: Chain Clutch: Wet. multi-plate Driveline: O ring chain Fuel consumption: 5.74 litres/100 km (17.4 km/l or 40.98 mpg) Greenhouse gases: 133.2 CO2 g/km. (CO2 - Carbon dioxide emission) Exhaust system: Stainless steel 3 into 1. high level stainless steel silencer CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Frame type: Tubular steel trellis frame Rake (fork angle): 24.3° Trail: 95 mm (3.8 inches) Front suspension: WP 43mm upside down forks, adjustable rebound and compression DAMPING Front suspension travel: 220 mm (8.7 inches) Rear suspension: WP monoshock with remote oil reservoir, hydraulically adjustable preload, rebound damping Rear suspension travel: 215 mm (8.5 inches) Front tyre: 90/90-21 Rear tyre: 150/70-17 Front brakes: Double disc. Floating discs, Nissin 2-piston sliding calipers, Switchable ABS. Front brakes diameter: 308 mm (12.1 inches) Rear brakes: Single disc. Nissin single piston sliding caliper, Switchable ABS. Rear brakes diameter: 255 mm (10.0 inches) Wheels: 36-spoke, aluminium rim. PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Dry weight: 193.0 kg (425.5 pounds) Weight incl. oil, gas, etc: 218.0 kg (480.6 pounds) Power/weight ratio: 0.4922 HP/kg Seat height: 845 mm (33.3 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Overall height: 1,390 mm (54.7 inches) Overall length: 2,215 mm (87.2 inches) Overall width: 865 mm (34.1 inches) Wheelbase: 1,545 mm (60.8 inches) Fuel capacity: 19.00 litres (5.02 gallons) Oil capacity: 3.70 litres (0.24 quarts) OTHER SPECIFICATIONS Starter: Electric Instruments: LCD multi-functional instrument pack with digital speedometer, trip computer, analogue tachometer, gear position indicator, fuel gauge, service indicator, switchable ABS and clock Carrying capacity: Top box, saddle bags Factory warranty: 24 months unlimited milage Color options: Black, White
  2. Nate J.

    Triumph Tiger 800 XC (2012)

    0 comments

    The Triumph Tiger 800XC is a very well made, light, and maneuverable bike. Very easy to handle off road with plenty of umph to hang on the freeway whilst traveling to your off-road destination.
  3. StonedInNy

    Hello adv riders

    Hi all, long time rider here mainly dirtbikes (ThumperTalk member) and some street. Recently got a 2013 tiger and already jonesing to go out and explore. Have a trip planned to WVA in 2 weeks and there's a lot of dirt roads on the map
  4. Bryan Bosch

    Triumph Tiger 800 XC 2013

    1 review

    GENERAL INFORMATION Model: Triumph Tiger 800 XC Year: 2013 Category: Allround ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Displacement: 799.00 ccm (48.75 cubic inches) Engine type: In-line three, four-stroke Power: 94.00 HP (68.6 kW)) @ 9300 RPM Torque: 78.65 Nm (8.0 kgf-m or 58.0 ft.lbs) @ 7850 RPM Compression: 12.0:1 Bore x stroke: 74.0 x 61.9 mm (2.9 x 2.4 inches) Fuel system: Injection. Multipoint sequential electronic fuel injection with SAI Fuel control: DOHC Ignition: Digital-inductive type via engine management system Cooling system: Liquid Gearbox: 6-speed Transmission type, final drive: Chain Clutch: Wet. multi-plate Driveline: X ring chain. Primary drive: Gear. CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Frame type: Tubular steel trellis frame Rake (fork angle): 23.1° Front suspension: Showa 45mm upside down forks. 220mm travel Rear suspension: Showa monoshock with remote oil reservoir. hydraulically adjustable preload. rebound damping adjustment. 215mm rear wheel travel Front tyre: 90/90-ZR21 Rear tyre: 150/70-ZR17 Front brakes: Double disc Front brakes diameter: 308 mm (12.1 inches) Rear brakes: Single disc Rear brakes diameter: 255 mm (10.0 inches) PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Weight incl. oil, gas, etc: 214.6 kg (473.0 pounds) Seat height: 843 mm (33.2 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Overall height: 1,349 mm (53.1 inches) Overall length: 2,212 mm (87.1 inches) Overall width: 864 mm (34.0 inches) Wheelbase: 1,567 mm (61.7 inches) Fuel capacity: 18.93 litres (5.00 gallons) OTHER SPECIFICATIONS Starter: Electric
  5. Wow! Installing in my 13 Triumph Tiger 800XC. I'll have a comparo to the stock lead acid shortly... What's the guess on the difference?
  6. Chris.GVS

    Triumph Tiger 800 XC 2014

    0 reviews

    GENERAL INFORMATION Model: Triumph Tiger 800 XC Year: 2014 Category: Allround ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Displacement: 799.00 ccm (48.75 cubic inches) Engine type: In-line three, four-stroke Power: 95.00 HP (69.3 kW)) @ 9300 RPM Torque: 79.00 Nm (8.1 kgf-m or 58.3 ft.lbs) @ 7850 RPM Bore x stroke: 74.0 x 61.9 mm (2.9 x 2.4 inches) Valves per cylinder: 4 Fuel system: Injection. Multipoint sequential electronic fuel injection Fuel control: DOHC Cooling system: Liquid Gearbox: 6-speed Transmission type, final drive: Chain Clutch: Wet. multi-plate Driveline: O ring chain Fuel consumption: 5.74 litres/100 km (17.4 km/l or 40.98 mpg) Greenhouse gases: 133.2 CO2 g/km. (CO2 - Carbon dioxide emission) Exhaust system: Stainless steel 3 into 1. high level stainless steel silencer CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Frame type: Tubular steel trellis frame Rake (fork angle): 24.3° Trail: 95 mm (3.8 inches) Front suspension: WP 43mm upside down forks, adjustable rebound and compression DAMPING Front suspension travel: 220 mm (8.7 inches) Rear suspension: WP monoshock with remote oil reservoir, hydraulically adjustable preload, rebound damping Rear suspension travel: 215 mm (8.5 inches) Front tyre: 90/90-21 Rear tyre: 150/70-17 Front brakes: Double disc. Floating discs, Nissin 2-piston sliding calipers, Switchable ABS. Front brakes diameter: 308 mm (12.1 inches) Rear brakes: Single disc. Nissin single piston sliding caliper, Switchable ABS. Rear brakes diameter: 255 mm (10.0 inches) Wheels: 36-spoke, aluminium rim. PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Dry weight: 193.0 kg (425.5 pounds) Weight incl. oil, gas, etc: 218.0 kg (480.6 pounds) Power/weight ratio: 0.4922 HP/kg Seat height: 845 mm (33.3 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Overall height: 1,390 mm (54.7 inches) Overall length: 2,215 mm (87.2 inches) Overall width: 865 mm (34.1 inches) Wheelbase: 1,545 mm (60.8 inches) Fuel capacity: 19.00 litres (5.02 gallons) Oil capacity: 3.70 litres (0.24 quarts) OTHER SPECIFICATIONS Starter: Electric Factory warranty: 24 months unlimited milage Color options: Black, White
  7. Chris.GVS

    Triumph Tiger 800 XC 2011

    0 reviews

    GENERAL INFORMATION Model: Triumph Tiger 800 XC Year: 2011 Category: Allround Rating: 79.6 out of 100. ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Displacement: 799.00 ccm (48.75 cubic inches) Engine type: In-line three, four-stroke Power: 94.00 HP (68.6 kW)) @ 9300 RPM Torque: 78.65 Nm (8.0 kgf-m or 58.0 ft.lbs) @ 7850 RPM Compression: 12.0:1 Bore x stroke: 74.0 x 61.9 mm (2.9 x 2.4 inches) Fuel system: Injection. Multipoint sequential electronic fuel injection with SAI Fuel control: DOHC Ignition: Digital-inductive type via engine management system Cooling system: Liquid Gearbox: 6-speed Transmission type, final drive: Chain Clutch: Wet. multi-plate Driveline: X ring chain. Primary drive: Gear. CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Frame type: Tubular steel trellis frame Rake (fork angle): 23.1° Front suspension: Showa 45mm upside down forks. 220mm travel Rear suspension: Showa monoshock with remote oil reservoir. hydraulically adjustable preload. rebound damping adjustment. 215mm rear wheel travel Front tyre: 90/90-ZR21 Rear tyre: 150/70-ZR17 Front brakes: Double disc Front brakes diameter: 308 mm (12.1 inches) Rear brakes: Single disc Rear brakes diameter: 255 mm (10.0 inches) PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Weight incl. oil, gas, etc: 214.6 kg (473.0 pounds) Seat height: 843 mm (33.2 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Overall height: 1,349 mm (53.1 inches) Overall length: 2,212 mm (87.1 inches) Overall width: 864 mm (34.0 inches) Wheelbase: 1,567 mm (61.7 inches) Fuel capacity: 18.93 litres (5.00 gallons) OTHER SPECIFICATIONS Starter: Electric Color options: Phantom Black. Crystal White. Intense Orange
  8. Today I did what you're suppose to do with an ADV bike... I rode it to the bank to make a deposit for the wife. Happy wife, I took the long way home. Lake Lola. Tigers and Gaters don't get along, so I kept my distance. Nursery Hill. 243ft above seal level. I felt a little dizzy. The highest point in all of Florida is 345ft. Glad the bike has FI. Yes, I went beyond Starbucks. Withlacoochee State Forrest. Wet Sand = hero traction, even on 90/10 Pirelli streetish tires. I do have new TKC80s to mount, but ride or work on the bike today? Easy choice... A lot of the trails are covered by a canopy of trees. Very lush. Some of the trails we're pretty slick from last night's rain. Enother dead end trail at the Withlacoochee River. TKC80s would have helped a bit, but I mananged. An open, dry meadow along the way. The 4X4 trucks had been in some areas, tearing the sheet out of the trail. Some sections made for interesting line choices. A nice 3 - 4 hour ride, just seeing what there is to see, with no particular destination or schedule. The more I ride my Tiger, the more I like it.
  9. I'm replacing chain and sprockets on the Tiger 800 XC this weekend if the weather isn't too nice... Any hints or tips for me? I've never done a chain or sprockets as most of my bikes have been shaft drive in the past :/ I figure bang pound and kick till the old is off and push and shove till the new are on? How bout torque values for the sprockets and axle?
  10. Recently I found my front/right turn signal dangling on its wires after a ride that was just not very rough. After doing a little Googling, I learned that Triumph has a recall on these turn signals. I also learned that owners were having to go back to the dealer more than once because the new signals installed under warranty aren't always fixing the problem. The nearest dealer to me is at least a hour's ride and I have to wait for them to be installed. The dealer won't promise anything but a couple of hour for service and they cannot mail the parts to me; must be dealer installed. I decided this was a PITA and an opportunity to tinker with the bike, so I decided to come up with my own solution. After looking at a number of options, I settled on two pair of DRC Products 602 LED turn signals w/ a smoke lens. My bike's color combo is pretty dark (Matte Green w/ black frame), so I thought that a smoked lens would look the best. The DRC Products 602 LED turn signals are rubber mounted on a metal threaded stalk. They are quite a bit smaller that the stock Triumph units and offer some degree of flexibility. These two attributes combined should offer better durability, but if they simply don't fall apart under light use like the OE Triumph units, I'll be happy. I also ordered up an OE Triumph LED flasher relay so that the blinker rate is not "hyper". Frankly, I don't think that hyper blinking is a big deal. In fact, part of me wonders if in fact the faster flash rate is MORE visible than stock? But then again, sometimes I think that I'm invisible out there anyway, so it likely doesn't matter much. It was very easy to install. Instructions can be found @ http://triumphinstructions.com/ProdDocs/A9830046-EN.pdf Before I went this route, I didn't bother to pull off the plastic cover behind the pillion pad. When I went to install the rear signals, the threaded stalks slipped into the holes just fine, but the nut to secure them... Houston, we have a problem! There is a metal structure for the taillight that needs to be slightly clearanced in order for the nut to thread onto the stalk. But, nothing that a Dremel can't handle and with a small brush, a little black paint when you're done, it's hard to tell that anything has been modified. Whatever material that is removed won't compromise the bracket a bit. It's fairly overbuilt to begin with. After clearancing, the nut threads on fit, but it's a bit of a nose picker when tightening up a box end 12mm wrench. But, each signal is ultra light weight, so they don't need much torque to stay in place. The front signals mount to the upper black plastic tank shrouds and since the DRC signals do not have an oblong mounting surface like OEM signals, if you just mount them to the shrouds, there isn't a ton of materials holding them. I ended up buying some plastic marker light adapter plates from Rizoma p/n FR218B. You get two plates; one for the inside and outside of the shroud. They are sandwiched between the signal stalk and the inner nut, created a stronger mount that also looks factory. The one thing that I do like about the OE signals is how they orient themselves correctly. They use a two hole shroud mount design, one being the mounting bolt & nut and the other the wires that run through a plastic alignment dowel. So, getting all your lights pointing in the same direction is a no-brainer. However, the DRC signals are mounted on a single shaft, so they can spin 360 degrees. I'd get them where I wanted them, but struggled a bit to keep them from moving a few degrees when tightening the inner nut. Not a big deal, but I tend to be a bit anal, so it drives me nutz when things are not completely uniform. So, I wasted more time than I should here. Not sure they are "perfect" but pretty sure that just about nobody will notice any variances. Installing the OE LED flasher was totally easy, using the provided instructions. It's just connecting up the supplied plug into the factory wiring, attaching 2 space connectors, grounding the flasher, and installing the rubber mounting band. It took me more time to route the ground wire like I wanted it than to install the LED flasher itself. Front, comparison with stock incandescent and DRC LED: Rears completed: Parts List DRC 602 LED Turn Signals Triumph LED Relay Rizoma Turn Signal Adapters
  11. akadigger

    Triumph Tiger 800 XC (2012)

    0 comments

    The Triumph Tiger 800XC does it all.
  12. GB.

    Triumph Tiger 800 XC (2012)

    0 comments

    My lovely beat-up '12 Tiger 800XC that took me to Prudhoe Bay n back and more places than I can remember with a sh*t eatin' grin ~Peter
  13. zodillyicous

    Triumph Tiger 800 XC (2012)

    1 comment

    Great ride. Had a 2012 road that I started with and upgraded when I found a deal on a used XC. Larger front wheel and better suspension were huge. That said, the the stock suspension sucks for someone bigger than average. With some upgrades it has been a great dual sport and tourer.
  14. zodillyicous

    Triumph Tiger 800 XC 2012

    6 reviews

    GENERAL INFORMATION Model: Triumph Tiger 800 XC Year: 2012 Category: Allround ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Displacement: 799.00 ccm (48.75 cubic inches) Engine type: In-line three, four-stroke Power: 94.00 HP (68.6 kW)) @ 9300 RPM Torque: 78.65 Nm (8.0 kgf-m or 58.0 ft.lbs) @ 7850 RPM Compression: 12.0:1 Bore x stroke: 74.0 x 61.9 mm (2.9 x 2.4 inches) Fuel system: Injection. Multipoint sequential electronic fuel injection with SAI Fuel control: DOHC Ignition: Digital-inductive type via engine management system Cooling system: Liquid Gearbox: 6-speed Transmission type, final drive: Chain Clutch: Wet. multi-plate Driveline: X ring chain. Primary drive: Gear. CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Frame type: Tubular steel trellis frame Rake (fork angle): 23.1° Front suspension: Showa 45mm upside down forks. 220mm travel Rear suspension: Showa monoshock with remote oil reservoir. hydraulically adjustable preload. rebound damping adjustment. 215mm rear wheel travel Front tyre: 90/90-ZR21 Rear tyre: 150/70-ZR17 Front brakes: Double disc Front brakes diameter: 308 mm (12.1 inches) Rear brakes: Single disc Rear brakes diameter: 255 mm (10.0 inches) PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Weight incl. oil, gas, etc: 214.6 kg (473.0 pounds) Seat height: 843 mm (33.2 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Overall height: 1,349 mm (53.1 inches) Overall length: 2,212 mm (87.1 inches) Overall width: 864 mm (34.0 inches) Wheelbase: 1,567 mm (61.7 inches) Fuel capacity: 18.93 litres (5.00 gallons) OTHER SPECIFICATIONS Starter: Electric
  15. Ok, l o n g time dirt bike guy turned ADV n00b late last spring. My questions is, when you are doing major DIY service, suspension work, or tire changes, how are you securing your bike in an upright position in the shop/garage/man cave? I have my ideas, but I'd like to see how you guys are doing it. I'd like to install some more aggressive tires and suspension mods (springs & valving) this spring. Bike is a 13 Tiger 800XC with no center stand. Since the big has a trellis frame (no lower frame rails), any issue resting the entire weight of the bike on the the oil pan? I ASS-U-ME not, but that's why I'm asking. Thanks in advance for your help XLADV'rs!
  16. Hey New here but thought it looked like a good spot to share a trip video. We rode a couple of bigger bikes on a Western States adventure this summer; a 2012 KTM 990 Adventure and a 2014 Triumph Tiger 800XC Looking for another good ride. Any suggestions? I'd like to do all of only 1 or 2 states and really get off road the entire time and explore. Link to video Western States Adventure KTM 990 and Triumph 800XC DUAL SPORT​
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