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Found 95 results

  1. Hi there! I've been quietly watching the forums and Instagram for a few months now. My name is Emily, and I live in the glorious glitter and shame that is Las Vegas. I've been riding since 2007. My first bike was an '06 Suzuki SV650s which became my only transportation for 5 of the 8 years I had her. I went bikeless for a few years (which obviously ruined my health and happiness), so I went out and bought a slightly-used '17 Triumph Tiger 800 XCA in late 2017. I had been looking at joining the ADV community for a while and specifically the Tiger, but I was gun-shy about about being hardcore enough. I also prefer having both feet on the ground, but I'm getting used to the good ol' Captain Morgan approach. So far any drops I've had have been the result of putting one of the wrong feet down, so I just generally try not to stop. I got lucky in that my tigger already had Barkbuster handguards and Triumph panniers. So far I've added or am waiting on the following: Continental TKC80s Rox Risers AltRider Crashbars AltRider Headlight Guard RAM Phone Mount (because how else will I find my way to Starbucks?) Stickers! (+5hp of course) So far I've only gone on 3 dirt rides and tooled around town (I let the stock Battle Wings hold me back after the first 2 dirt trails). I'm attending RawHyde's Level 1: Intro To Adventure Camp on the 23rd, so hopefully I'll have more confidence to adventure harder and more frequently!
  2. Ok, l o n g time dirt bike guy turned ADV n00b late last spring. My questions is, when you are doing major DIY service, suspension work, or tire changes, how are you securing your bike in an upright position in the shop/garage/man cave? I have my ideas, but I'd like to see how you guys are doing it. I'd like to install some more aggressive tires and suspension mods (springs & valving) this spring. Bike is a 13 Tiger 800XC with no center stand. Since the big has a trellis frame (no lower frame rails), any issue resting the entire weight of the bike on the the oil pan? I ASS-U-ME not, but that's why I'm asking. Thanks in advance for your help XLADV'rs!
  3. Well folks I just found out over at Tiger800.uk that BB has lost their OE Triumph parts franchise. This sucks as I ordered half a new XCx from them over the past year and a half or so. Dealer's is a bother and hang-out for rejects from Moto-Corsa and I can't order online late at night. Looks like the hunt is on for a new OE online supplier that doesn't require the ever-popular VIN. I'm stinking tired of Triumph continually asking for it in a thinly-disguised data mining operation. As I've said before: Love the bike, hate the company at times. This makes a double whammy as Cal-Moto just lost their franchise over T's demands on their retail side, so everything is on clearance sale and no more sales or warranty work. Way to go, Triumph. As for the Cal Moto flap it looks like they were trying to do the usual: Make them install about a hundred and fourty grands' worth of brand image frivolity which doesn't equate sales necessarily, but does reflect what corporate tells them. I wonder how Latus Motors gets away with it....Triumph looks like an ugly step child at their Dealership full of knuckle-drag.....T's only signage is a vinyl sign lashed to a chain link off the freeway. If it wasn't for Cycletrader I'd never have known it was a Triumph dealership under all that Harley stuff but there it is.
  4. Hello, I have an XL ADV - 2014 Triumph Explorer XC that I ride like a 250 trail bike as often as possible. I've ridden it as far as from northeast Ohio to Myrtle Beach, but the past year I've been doing a lot of off-roading and adventure riding with it. I went to the Touratech Rally East in August and made some new friends. Looking forward to continuing to find new limits with the big Tiger in spite of its weight.
  5. Recently I found my front/right turn signal dangling on its wires after a ride that was just not very rough. After doing a little Googling, I learned that Triumph has a recall on these turn signals. I also learned that owners were having to go back to the dealer more than once because the new signals installed under warranty aren't always fixing the problem. The nearest dealer to me is at least a hour's ride and I have to wait for them to be installed. The dealer won't promise anything but a couple of hour for service and they cannot mail the parts to me; must be dealer installed. I decided this was a PITA and an opportunity to tinker with the bike, so I decided to come up with my own solution. After looking at a number of options, I settled on two pair of DRC Products 602 LED turn signals w/ a smoke lens. My bike's color combo is pretty dark (Matte Green w/ black frame), so I thought that a smoked lens would look the best. The DRC Products 602 LED turn signals are rubber mounted on a metal threaded stalk. They are quite a bit smaller that the stock Triumph units and offer some degree of flexibility. These two attributes combined should offer better durability, but if they simply don't fall apart under light use like the OE Triumph units, I'll be happy. I also ordered up an OE Triumph LED flasher relay so that the blinker rate is not "hyper". Frankly, I don't think that hyper blinking is a big deal. In fact, part of me wonders if in fact the faster flash rate is MORE visible than stock? But then again, sometimes I think that I'm invisible out there anyway, so it likely doesn't matter much. It was very easy to install. Instructions can be found @ http://triumphinstructions.com/ProdDocs/A9830046-EN.pdf Before I went this route, I didn't bother to pull off the plastic cover behind the pillion pad. When I went to install the rear signals, the threaded stalks slipped into the holes just fine, but the nut to secure them... Houston, we have a problem! There is a metal structure for the taillight that needs to be slightly clearanced in order for the nut to thread onto the stalk. But, nothing that a Dremel can't handle and with a small brush, a little black paint when you're done, it's hard to tell that anything has been modified. Whatever material that is removed won't compromise the bracket a bit. It's fairly overbuilt to begin with. After clearancing, the nut threads on fit, but it's a bit of a nose picker when tightening up a box end 12mm wrench. But, each signal is ultra light weight, so they don't need much torque to stay in place. The front signals mount to the upper black plastic tank shrouds and since the DRC signals do not have an oblong mounting surface like OEM signals, if you just mount them to the shrouds, there isn't a ton of materials holding them. I ended up buying some plastic marker light adapter plates from Rizoma p/n FR218B. You get two plates; one for the inside and outside of the shroud. They are sandwiched between the signal stalk and the inner nut, created a stronger mount that also looks factory. The one thing that I do like about the OE signals is how they orient themselves correctly. They use a two hole shroud mount design, one being the mounting bolt & nut and the other the wires that run through a plastic alignment dowel. So, getting all your lights pointing in the same direction is a no-brainer. However, the DRC signals are mounted on a single shaft, so they can spin 360 degrees. I'd get them where I wanted them, but struggled a bit to keep them from moving a few degrees when tightening the inner nut. Not a big deal, but I tend to be a bit anal, so it drives me nutz when things are not completely uniform. So, I wasted more time than I should here. Not sure they are "perfect" but pretty sure that just about nobody will notice any variances. Installing the OE LED flasher was totally easy, using the provided instructions. It's just connecting up the supplied plug into the factory wiring, attaching 2 space connectors, grounding the flasher, and installing the rubber mounting band. It took me more time to route the ground wire like I wanted it than to install the LED flasher itself. Front, comparison with stock incandescent and DRC LED: Rears completed: Parts List DRC 602 LED Turn Signals Triumph LED Relay Rizoma Turn Signal Adapters
  6. I'm replacing chain and sprockets on the Tiger 800 XC this weekend if the weather isn't too nice... Any hints or tips for me? I've never done a chain or sprockets as most of my bikes have been shaft drive in the past :/ I figure bang pound and kick till the old is off and push and shove till the new are on? How bout torque values for the sprockets and axle?
  7. 0 comments

    The Triumph Tiger 800XC does it all.
  8. 0 comments

    Compared to others in it's class it was the most comfortable for me. I adore the 3 cylinder engine.
  9. Wow! Installing in my 13 Triumph Tiger 800XC. I'll have a comparo to the stock lead acid shortly... What's the guess on the difference?
  10. 0 comments

    This bike is just plain amazing! Add new tires and some boxes and go everywhere.
  11. AltRider announced today a new line of protection parts (skid plates, oil cooler guards, headlight guards, radiator guards, luggage racks, high fender mounts) for the Ducati Scrambler as well as three Triumph bikes: Bonneville, Scrambler and Thruxton.
  12. Steve Kamrad (the yeti on the left) and Spurgeon Dunbar raced (and won) their Triumph Tiger 800's in this all day race in Canada. Full story here.
  13. Hey New here but thought it looked like a good spot to share a trip video. We rode a couple of bigger bikes on a Western States adventure this summer; a 2012 KTM 990 Adventure and a 2014 Triumph Tiger 800XC Looking for another good ride. Any suggestions? I'd like to do all of only 1 or 2 states and really get off road the entire time and explore. Link to video Western States Adventure KTM 990 and Triumph 800XC DUAL SPORT​
  14. 0 comments

    Fun
  15. 0 comments

    My lovely beat-up '12 Tiger 800XC that took me to Prudhoe Bay n back and more places than I can remember with a sh*t eatin' grin ~Peter
  16. 0 comments

    So far I love this bike, I have plans on some, like engine gaurds, off road tires as well as some little mods. I'm finding the mods department a little light for this year and make. It's all nothing I can handle though.
  17. ATLANTA, GA - November 17, 2015 - (Motor Sports Newswire) - The new Tiger Explorer family has been conceived, designed and built to deliver the ultimate transcontinental adventure motorcycle for every adventure rider. NEW Triumph Tiger Explorer XR and XC ranges 6 new motorcycles - Explorer XC, Explorer XCx, Explorer XCa, Explorer XR, Explorer XRx and Explorer XRt – an Explorer for every adventure 1215cc triple engine with shaft final drive with more power and more torque – the most powerful in the adventure segment NEW rider-focused and active technology NEW cornering-optimized Traction Control and ABS NEW TSAS – semi-active suspension system NEW low seat variants NEW first-in class electrically adjustable screen NEW Hill Hold Control system The new Triumph Explorer range is divided into two distinct model variants - the XR series, designed and optimized to deliver the ultimate on-road ride, and the XC series is designed to excel off-road. Both the XR and XC models are more than capable of performing in either environment. The range-topping Explorer XCa and Explorer XRt models offer an unprecedented level of equipment and technology to provide a motorcycle completely prepared for any adventure – no matter the distance or destination. All models, from the range-entry Explorer XR and Explorer XC through to the top tier XCa and XRt, feature a 1215cc triple engine, unique in the large capacity adventure segment, delivering its power through a final shaft drive. The triple engine’s power is delivered smoothly and progressively across the rev and speed ranges through its linear torque curve. A torque-assisted clutch makes the clutch action incredibly light, in turn making both long distances and stop-start urban riding less demanding on the rider. The engine performance is also enhanced through a new exhaust system, with a distinctive resonant note. The new Tiger Explorer features a host of technological upgrades with a particular emphasis on state-of-the-art active technology to ensure superb stability and control. These features include: Triumph Semi-active Suspension Corner optimized switchable ABS and Traction Control The introduction of Rider Modes, including a rider programmable mode Hill Hold control The new Tiger Explorer’s overall performance is given a new level of dynamism through the use of WP adjustable suspension on the two entry-level models. The other four models feature the groundbreaking Triumph Semi Active Suspension system. This allows the rider to electronically control the adjustment of the front and rear suspension damping, automatically adapting the rear shock absorber pre-load settings to reflect the terrain being covered and providing optimal grip and drive in any situation. To give the rider the handling, control and response they want to negotiate well-made roads and broken terrain in all conditions, the Tiger Explorer offers as standard multi-channel switchable ABS and traction control on the entry level XR and XC models. The other four variants come with cornering-optimized ABS and traction control, to ensure superb stability even when approaching the most challenging apex. The Explorer XCx, XCa, XRx and XRT all feature an Inertial Measurement Unit that, through a series of strategically positioned sensors, monitors and responds to the bike’s movement status, calculates the lean angle of the bikes and uses this measurement to ensure greater stability by optimizing the performance of the ABS and traction control systems. Add to this the choice of up to five different Rider Modes – four which are pre-set and one which can be programmed by the rider – which alters the configuration of the bike to suit riding style, road and weather conditions. Additionally the new Hill Hold Control feature prevents the motorcycle rolling back when attempting to set off on a steep incline – particularly beneficial when the motorcycle is fully loaded or carrying a passenger. A new engine with more power, improved handling, rider and active rider-focused technology packaged in a family of bikes with a contemporary look and style that are distinctly their own. Featuring sharp new lines giving a stylish and muscular look and combining to deliver enhanced rider and passenger thermal comfort. Additionally all models introduce a first-in-class electrically adjustable screen that allows the rider to constantly tailor aero protection and comfort whilst riding. The new Triumph Tiger Explorer range, with its choice of specifications and switchable, selectable and programmable features, is a range of bikes that allows riders to tailor their desired adventure, to go anywhere and everywhere from the daily commute to the corners of the earth. Tiger Explorer XR and XC series Spec highlights include (varies depending on model): Unique 1215cc triple engine with shaft final drive Contemporary and distinctive Adventure styling 2 Low seat variants (available on Tiger Explorer XRX and XCX models) ABS and traction control Cornering-optimised ABS and traction control Up to five selectable Rider Modes, including rider programmable WP adjustable front and rear suspension Triumph Semi Active Suspension Brembo monobloc 4-piston radial calipers On-board computer Advanced on-board computer Inertial measurement unit Hill Hold control Tyre Pressure Monitoring System Electrically adjustable screen Electrically adjustable Touring screen Immobiliser Spoked wheels (XC models) Cast wheels (XR models) 12V Power socket/s 5V under seat USB socket Heated rider/passenger seat Heated grips Cruise control Hand guards Aluminium sump guard Plastic sump guard Radiator guard Engine bars Fog lights TPMS Machined footrests Pannier mounting kit About Triumph Triumph Motorcycles is the British premium, lifestyle brand, which produces a wide range of distinctive, cool, and authentic Modern Classic, Adventure, Sport, Cruiser and Touring motorcycles. Also the oldest continually produced motorcycle brand, the first Triumph was manufactured in 1902. The company's global headquarters are located in Hinckley, Leicestershire, England, solely owned by Bloor Holdings Ltd. Triumph Motorcycles America Ltd., its North American subsidiary, is based in Atlanta, Ga., and is home to the motorcycle industry’s first 24/7 Customer Support team. To see the full range of Triumph motorcycles, visit www.TriumphMotorcycles.com. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TriumphNorthAmerica Twitter: https://twitter.com/triumphamerica Instagram: https://instagram.com/triumphamerica YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/TriumphNorthAmerica
  18. A first year rally is really a magical thing. What to expect and what will the event organizers get right or wrong is part of the adventure you can only get at the inaugural year. Let’s face it, we’re talking about Touratech here; the German made, industry leading, technically superior, aftermarket accessory company. What could they get wrong? The first thing they did get right with the Touratech Rally East, located in Huntingdon, PA was the cost. At $90.67 a early bird ticket for a Thursday through Sunday event (August 13th-16th) this could be some comparatively inexpensive fun. Showing up on Thursday early was good on my part - after setting up camp in the segregated motorcycle area I was able to go hit the grass track that was burned in on the 220 acre farm property, then follow up the grass track with a loop of the big bike trails in another field. After 5 laps on the grass track with only one highside, I decided that if that was all the riding I was to do this whole trip it was already worth the money. Touratech didn’t let anyone down with riding choices. Their team brought a couple laptops with connection cords for all the gps hardware systems out there and they uploaded multiple routes for everyone to do self-guided rides. They also staffed guided tours of every option for those new to the game or those that were there solo. There were a staggering number of new to the adventure motorcycling community attendees at this event, which goes to show the reach and influence the mighty Germans at Touratech have within their community. Friday and Saturday’s rides were mainly large loops around and through Bald Eagle State Forest and Rothrock State Forest with varying degrees of difficulty depending on which route you chose. With the longer loops coming in at over 100 and 150 miles for Friday and Saturday respectively, and the shorter loops ranging as little at 7 miles for barbeque and 50 miles for a half day ride. Twisting tarmac and gravel made up the intermediate loops The long loop experienced routes delivered enough challenging parts with rocky unmaintained jeep trails to keep the ride interesting. It’s a shame the team putting the route together didn’t have access to all the trails - this area is under strict supervision by DCNR and permitting is tough. Hopefully next year they’ll go through the extra paperwork to make this ride truly special. For anyone on a single cylinder dirt bike these options would have been a little underwhelming, but on the large ADV bike that Touratech convinces everyone to bring off-road these trails were plenty challenging. The one truly challenging part of this rally was the food situation. Now Touratech gave fair warning that one or two food vendors would be available and that Saturday night’s barbecue dinner by Doan’s Bones (at an optional $20) would be the only catered meal. However, there was spotty coverage by vendors at the event, and many people who hadn’t packed full cooking gear on their bikes were left wondering if they would go hungry. For the number of caterers, fire houses, etc in the area willing to get paid to do a meal, it would have been well worth the organizers time to charge more for a fully catered event. Hungry riders with no room for camp stoves on their bikes shouldn’t live off of jet-boil food the whole weekend and have trouble leaving to get food after a post ride beer. In the end everyone survived, but next year we’re crossing our fingers for a catered event……....and showers. Friday’s and Saturday’s evening field games and slow races were great to watch. Everyone gathered around to watch the Friday night Quinn Cody uphill/downhill “tight turns” challenge course. Saturday nights slow race was epically good with one on one eliminations. Making Touratech feel a bit more home grown they allowed their staff to grab a bike and compete in these events which makes for some good laughs and lets you know that these guys and girls are human just like the rest of us. On Saturday as a closer to the event raffle tickets were passed out and prizes given away. While everyone drank beer from their Touratech Rally mugs the numbers were called out. Most of the prizes were Main Line Overland or Overland journal, but a good amount were from Icon Raiden like riding jerseys, gloves and the always cool Raiden trucker hat. Going into work Monday with co workers asking “how was your adventure weekend?” I find that our stories don’t translate well with the uninformed. You spent 3 nights camping in a field with no showers, swam in a lake for a bath, rode your 20 thousand dollar motorcycle off-road and now it’s all dirty and scratched cause you dropped it? Well yes. Yes we did and it was a blast!
  19. Triumph Unveils New Consumer Visa Platinum Credit Card that Fuels Adventure 7 07 2015 ATLANTA, GA – July 7, 2015 – (Motor Sports Newswire) – Triumph Motorcycles America is introducing the Triumph Visa® Platinum credit card, a new affinity card that rewards motorcycle enthusiasts for their everyday purchases. The card offers reward points redeemable for merchandise, electronics, travel and $100 Triumph vouchers. The Triumph Visa Platinum is available in six distinctive Triumph liveries, each representing an integral part of the company’s brand image. In keeping with Triumph being the first in the motorcycle industry to have 24/7 Customer Support, the card also provides 24/7 personal customer service. Additional benefits of the card: Competitive Rates Auto Rental Collision Damage Waiver* Travel Accident Insurance** Lost or Stolen Card Replacement Fraud Monitoring and Zero Fraud Liability Verified by Visa® ATM Cash Withdrawals “Triumph is excited to offer our first Visa Platinum credit card to all motorcyclists and Triumph enthusiasts. We’re always looking to further our engagement and provide value to our customers,” said Matt Sheahan, COO of Triumph Motorcycles America. “FreedomRoad Financial has been a great partner of Triumph and our retailers, and we’re happy to have them also as financial partners with this new venture.” The Triumph Visa Platinum credit card is offered through Evergreen Bank Group. FreedomRoad Financial, consumer-lending partner of Triumph Motorcycles America, is a division of Evergreen Bank. FreedomRoad Financial is one of the nation’s leading powersports lending companies. “We are proud to partner with Triumph to introduce a unique credit card,” said Tom Collins, Executive Vice President of FreedomRoad Financial. “The card further supports the Triumph enthusiast’s adventurous lifestyle and devotion to their favorite motorcycle brand.” Visit your local Triumph dealer to pick up more information on the Triumph Visa Platinum credit card and apply online at www.TriumphMotorcycles.com by clicking “Offers and Services.”
  20. Today I did what you're suppose to do with an ADV bike... I rode it to the bank to make a deposit for the wife. Happy wife, I took the long way home. Lake Lola. Tigers and Gaters don't get along, so I kept my distance. Nursery Hill. 243ft above seal level. I felt a little dizzy. The highest point in all of Florida is 345ft. Glad the bike has FI. Yes, I went beyond Starbucks. Withlacoochee State Forrest. Wet Sand = hero traction, even on 90/10 Pirelli streetish tires. I do have new TKC80s to mount, but ride or work on the bike today? Easy choice... A lot of the trails are covered by a canopy of trees. Very lush. Some of the trails we're pretty slick from last night's rain. Enother dead end trail at the Withlacoochee River. TKC80s would have helped a bit, but I mananged. An open, dry meadow along the way. The 4X4 trucks had been in some areas, tearing the sheet out of the trail. Some sections made for interesting line choices. A nice 3 - 4 hour ride, just seeing what there is to see, with no particular destination or schedule. The more I ride my Tiger, the more I like it.
  21. 0 reviews

    GENERAL INFORMATION Model: Triumph Tiger Explorer XC Year: 2015 Category: Allround ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Displacement: 1215.00 ccm (74.14 cubic inches) Engine type: In-line three, four-stroke Power: 137.00 HP (100.0 kW)) @ 9300 RPM Torque: 121.00 Nm (12.3 kgf-m or 89.2 ft.lbs) @ 6400 RPM Bore x stroke: 85.0 x 71.4 mm (3.3 x 2.8 inches) Valves per cylinder: 4 Fuel system: Injection. Drive by wire. fuel injection Fuel control: DOHC Cooling system: Liquid Gearbox: 6-speed Transmission type, final drive: Shaft drive (cardan) Clutch: Wet. multi-plate Fuel consumption: 4.90 litres/100 km (20.4 km/l or 48.00 mpg) Greenhouse gases: 113.7 CO2 g/km. (CO2 - Carbon dioxide emission) Exhaust system: Stainless steel 3 into 1 . side mounted stainless steel silencer CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Frame type: Tubular steel trellis frame Rake (fork angle): 23.9° Trail: 106 mm (4.2 inches) Front suspension: KYB 46mm upside down forks Front suspension travel: 190 mm (7.5 inches) Rear suspension: Kayaba monoshock with remote oil reservoir, hydraulically adjustable preload, rebound damping adjustment Rear suspension travel: 194 mm (7.6 inches) Front tyre: 110/80-18 Rear tyre: 150/70-17 Front brakes: Double disc. ABS. Floating discs, Nissin 4-piston calipers, Switchable ABS Front brakes diameter: 305 mm (12.0 inches) Rear brakes: Single disc. ABS. Nissin 2-piston sliding caliper, Switchable ABS Rear brakes diameter: 282 mm (11.1 inches) Wheels: Cast aluminium alloy 10-spoke PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Dry weight: 228.0 kg (502.7 pounds) Weight incl. oil, gas, etc: 259.0 kg (571.0 pounds) Power/weight ratio: 0.6009 HP/kg Seat height: 837 mm (33.0 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Overall height: 1,410 mm (55.5 inches) Overall length: 2,248 mm (88.5 inches) Overall width: 885 mm (34.8 inches) Wheelbase: 1,530 mm (60.2 inches) Fuel capacity: 20.00 litres (5.28 gallons) Oil capacity: 4.00 litres (0.26 quarts) OTHER SPECIFICATIONS Starter: Electric Instruments: LCD instrument pack with digital speedometer, analogue tachometer, gear position indicator, fuel gauge, range to empty, service indicator, clock, air temperature, frost warning, hazard warning lights, trip computer, Tyre pressure monitoring system Color options: Red, Graphite
  22. 0 reviews

    GENERAL INFORMATION Model: Triumph Tiger Explorer XC Year: 2014 Category: Allround ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Displacement: 1215.00 ccm (74.14 cubic inches) Engine type: In-line three, four-stroke Power: 137.00 HP (100.0 kW)) @ 9300 RPM Torque: 121.00 Nm (12.3 kgf-m or 89.2 ft.lbs) @ 6400 RPM Bore x stroke: 85.0 x 71.4 mm (3.3 x 2.8 inches) Valves per cylinder: 4 Fuel system: Injection. Drive by wire. fuel injection Fuel control: DOHC Cooling system: Liquid Gearbox: 6-speed Transmission type, final drive: Shaft drive (cardan) Clutch: Wet. multi-plate Fuel consumption: 4.90 litres/100 km (20.4 km/l or 48.00 mpg) Greenhouse gases: 113.7 CO2 g/km. (CO2 - Carbon dioxide emission) Exhaust system: Stainless steel 3 into 1 . side mounted stainless steel silencer CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Frame type: Tubular steel trellis frame Rake (fork angle): 23.9° Trail: 106 mm (4.2 inches) Front suspension: KYB 46mm upside down forks Front suspension travel: 190 mm (7.5 inches) Rear suspension: Kayaba monoshock with remote oil reservoir, hydraulically adjustable preload, rebound damping adjustment Rear suspension travel: 194 mm (7.6 inches) Front tyre: 110/80-18 Rear tyre: 150/70-17 Front brakes: Double disc. ABS. Floating discs, Nissin 4-piston calipers, Switchable ABS Front brakes diameter: 305 mm (12.0 inches) Rear brakes: Single disc. ABS. Nissin 2-piston sliding caliper, Switchable ABS Rear brakes diameter: 282 mm (11.1 inches) Wheels: Cast aluminium alloy 10-spoke PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Dry weight: 228.0 kg (502.7 pounds) Weight incl. oil, gas, etc: 259.0 kg (571.0 pounds) Power/weight ratio: 0.6009 HP/kg Seat height: 837 mm (33.0 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Overall height: 1,410 mm (55.5 inches) Overall length: 2,248 mm (88.5 inches) Overall width: 885 mm (34.8 inches) Wheelbase: 1,530 mm (60.2 inches) Fuel capacity: 20.00 litres (5.28 gallons) Oil capacity: 4.00 litres (0.26 quarts) OTHER SPECIFICATIONS Starter: Electric
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    GENERAL INFORMATION Model: Triumph Tiger Explorer XC Year: 2013 Category: Allround ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION Displacement: 1215.00 ccm (74.14 cubic inches) Engine type: In-line three, four-stroke Power: 137.00 HP (100.0 kW)) @ 9400 RPM Torque: 121.00 Nm (12.3 kgf-m or 89.2 ft.lbs) @ 6400 RPM Compression: 12.0:1 Bore x stroke: 85.0 x 85.0 mm (3.3 x 3.3 inches) Valves per cylinder: 4 Fuel system: Injection. Drive by wire. fuel injection Fuel control: DOHC Ignition: Digital-inductive type via engine management system Cooling system: Liquid Gearbox: 6-speed Transmission type, final drive: Shaft drive (cardan) Clutch: Wet. multi-plate Exhaust system: Stainless steel 3 into 1 . side mounted stainless steel silencer CHASSIS, SUSPENSION, BRAKES AND WHEELS Frame type: Tubular steel trellis frame Rake (fork angle): 23.9° Front suspension: Kayaba 46mm upside down forks, 190mm travel Rear suspension: Kayaba monoshock with remote oil reservoir, hydraulically adjustable preload, rebound damping adjustment, 194mm rear wheel travel Front tyre: 110/80-19 Rear tyre: 150/70-17 Front brakes: Double disc. Switchable ABS Front brakes diameter: 305 mm (12.0 inches) Rear brakes: Single disc. Switchable ABS Rear brakes diameter: 282 mm (11.1 inches) Wheels: Cast aluminium alloy 10-spoke PHYSICAL MEASURES AND CAPACITIES Weight incl. oil, gas, etc: 259.0 kg (571.0 pounds) Seat height: 837 mm (33.0 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. Overall height: 1,410 mm (55.5 inches) Overall length: 2,248 mm (88.5 inches) Overall width: 962 mm (37.9 inches) Wheelbase: 1,530 mm (60.2 inches) Fuel capacity: 20.00 litres (5.28 gallons) Oil capacity: 4.00 litres (0.26 quarts) OTHER SPECIFICATIONS Starter: Electric Instruments: LCD instrument pack with digital speedometer, analogue tachometer, gear position indicator, fuel gauge, range to empty, service indicator, clock, air temperature, frost warning, hazard warning lights, trip computer, Tyre pressure monitoring system